Jazz Jazz and blues music performances and features from NPR news, NPR cultural programs, and NPR Music stations.

Jazz

Top left, clockwise: PinkPantheress, Lucas Debargue, Lee Morgan, James Blake, Injury Reserve, Foxing. Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

John Coltrane, photographed performing at The Penthouse during a run of performances in Seattle, Wash. in 1965. A recording of one, long lost, is now being released as A Love Supreme: Live in Seattle. Chuck Stewart/Courtesy Universal Music Group hide caption

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Chuck Stewart/Courtesy Universal Music Group

John Coltrane's Masterpiece Breathes New Life With 'A Love Supreme: Live In Seattle'

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Trumpeter Charlie Porter and bassist John Lakey perform in May 2021. Aaron Hayman/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Aaron Hayman/Courtesy of the artist

Portland's Montavilla Jazz Brings Music To Your Front Door

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Femi (right) and Made Kuti (left) Optimus Dammy/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Optimus Dammy/Courtesy of the artist

Femi & Made Kuti on World Cafe

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Matthew Whitaker, Gabrielle Cassava and Pedrito Martinez perform at the Exit Zero Jazz Festival. Richard Conde/Mitra I. Arthur/NPR hide caption

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Richard Conde/Mitra I. Arthur/NPR

On The Road Again: Musicians Return To The Stage At Exit Zero

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Questlove, here at the Grammys in January 2020, says the pandemic has changed him. Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for the Recording Academy hide caption

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Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for the Recording Academy

For Questlove, The Pandemic Meant Embracing Quiet — And Buying A Farm

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Alice Coltrane, widow of jazz great John Coltrane, playing the piano in her California home, in front of a portrait of her late husband. Despite having practiced music since a very early age, Alice Coltrane's work only somewhat recently began to be recognized. J.Emilio Flores/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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J.Emilio Flores/Corbis via Getty Images