Latin NPR Music stories featuring Latin Alternative music.

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Participants in Aurelio Martinez's Garifuna music program in Honduras, dancing to their own beats. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

'Music As A Weapon': A Discussion About Garifuna Music

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Uruguayan artists Juan Wauters talks new music and his ever-evolving sound on this week's magazine show. Lucia Garibaldi/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Lucia Garibaldi/Courtesy of the artist

Loss, Love And Resilience Across Latinidad

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A young boy from the dance group Sangre Nueva shows off his moves in La Maya, Santiago de Cuba. Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi/Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi/Courtesy of the Artist

Bakosó: Cuban Grooves Meet Afrobeats

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Pedrito Martinez and Rubén Blades continue to defy expectations with the release of their two new albums. Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration

You Just Can't Peg Pedrito Martinez And Rubén Blades

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Legendary Mexican Regional band Los Tigres del Norte keeping it real at Kingsbridge Armory in the Bronx. John Reilly/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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John Reilly/Courtesy of the artist

Not Your Abuela's Music: A Deep Dive Into Mexican Regional Music

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Venezuelan-born rising starlet maye will perform at this week's LAMC. Fernando Osorio/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Fernando Osorio/Courtesy of the artist

Alt.Latino's LAMC 2021 Cheat Sheet

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Ben Lapidus discusses his novel New York and the International Sound of Latin Music, 1940-1990. Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration

New York City's Influence On Latin Music

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Fans paying tribute to Selena in Texas. Jana Birchum/Getty Images hide caption

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Jana Birchum/Getty Images

Mon Laferte's new album is called SEIS. Mayra Ortiz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Mayra Ortiz/Courtesy of the artist

Speed Dating Through Spring's New Music

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Mexican jazz legend Tino Contreras celebrates his 97th birthday with a special concert from Mexico City. Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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A 97-Year-Old Mexican Jazz Drummer's Latest Gig

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Omar Sosa's new album is An East African Journey. Massimo Mantovani/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Massimo Mantovani/Courtesy of the artist

Omar Sosa Takes A Journey To East Africa

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Two different authors explore Latin music history and its future. Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration

From The 'Cosmic Barrio' To 'Despacito,' Two Latin Music Books We Love

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Melissa Aldana, a saxophone wielding chingona, included among this week's female instrumentalists. Holis King/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Holis King/Courtesy of the artist

Women Are Instrumental To Latin Music

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