Latin NPR Music stories featuring Latin Alternative music.

Latin

From left, producer Sebastian Krys, vocalist Nina Diaz and musician Elvis Costello reimagined a 1970s classic album. Paul Moore/Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Moore/Courtesy of the Artist

Elvis En Español: 'This Year's Model' Reimagined

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1038345252/1038609358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Eblis Alvaraez (Meridian Brothers) and Iván Medellin (Conjunto Media Luna) have one of the albums featured this week. Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the Artist

Alt. Latino's Fall Music Preview

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1035881142/1035933510" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Ana Macho's "Cuerpa" is featured on this week's episode. YouTube hide caption

toggle caption
YouTube

End Of Summer Rooftop Listening Party

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1034075807/1034449824" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Gina Chavez, who was a Tiny Desk Contest judge in 2020, was overwhelmed by the Latin entries for 2021. Ismael Quintanilla III/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Ismael Quintanilla III/Courtesy of the artist

Gina Chavez Picks Her 5 Favorite Tiny Desk Contest Entries

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1027387953/1027455033" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

We follow Latin Urban's trail from Panama to Puerto Rico to the world stage, including international superstar Bad Bunny. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Savage X Fenty hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Savage X Fenty

Encore: The Meteoric Rise Of Latin Urban Explained

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1023890446/1025498215" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Aventura, from left: Romeo Santos, Henry Santos Jeter, Max Santos and Lenny Santos, photographed while attending the White House music series "Fiesta Latina" on October 13, 2009 in Washington D.C. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pool/Getty Images

New Favorites From Alt.Latino: Aventura, Rawayana And More

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1025213485/1025845786" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Johnny Ventura, seen here at the Latin Grammys in 2013, died at the age of 81 on Wednesday. Jason Merritt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Merritt/Getty Images

Dominican Merengue Star Johnny Ventura Dies At 81

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1022062282/1022536916" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From Havana to Miami (pictured here), protestors have chanted, "Patria y Vida," or homeland and life, a clever play on the revered, long-held mantra of the Cuban government: patria o muerte. Scott McIntyre/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott McIntyre/The Washington Post via Getty Images

We Excavate Cuba's Rallying Cry, 'Patria Y Vida'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1019761894/1020129538" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Gente de Zona's "Patria y Vida" (pictured, right: Randy Malcom in Miami) reclaims a slogan made popular at the birth of the Cuban revolution, "Patria o Muerte" (Homeland or Death), 62 years ago. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

In a time when facts are political, Amarante thinks "maybe theater, drama, can be remembered as a vehicle to reflect a truth." Jessica Pons for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Pons for NPR

Rodrigo Amarante And His Great Musical Tantrum

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1016645441/1017012929" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man waves a Cuban flag during a demonstration against Cuban President Miguel Díaz-Canel's government Sunday in Havana as large numbers take part in rare protests against the communist regime. Adalberto Roque/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Adalberto Roque/AFP via Getty Images

The Hip-Hop Song That's Driving Cuba's Unprecedented Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1015318087/1015334514" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Puerto Rican superstar Rauw Alejandro's "Todo de Ti" has taken the Latin pop world by storm. Marik Curet/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Marik Curet/Courtesy of the artist

No Boundaries On The Island: The Music Of Puerto Rico

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1014211817/1014713289" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lin-Manuel Miranda's In The Heights hit the silver screen on June 11, making a big splash in the world of Latinx media. Macall Polay/Courtesy of Warner Brothers hide caption

toggle caption
Macall Polay/Courtesy of Warner Brothers

Lin-Manuel Miranda, Los Lobos And Tania León Post Their W's

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007262800/1007956264" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Participants in Aurelio Martinez's Garifuna music program in Honduras, dancing to their own beats. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

'Music As A Weapon': A Discussion About Garifuna Music

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005159259/1005722899" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Uruguayan artists Juan Wauters talks new music and his ever-evolving sound on this week's magazine show. Lucia Garibaldi/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Lucia Garibaldi/Courtesy of the artist

Loss, Love And Resilience Across Latinidad

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1002871314/1003411837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">