Animals Animals

Animals

The Beluga whale swims in the lock of Notre Dame de la Garenne in Saint-Pierre-la-Garenne, west of Paris, France, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2022. During Wednesday's rescue operation, the dangerously thin animal began to have breathing difficulties, and experts decided the most humane thing to do was to euthanize the creature. Aurelien Morissard/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Aurelien Morissard/AP

A screenshot of a map showing case counts of COVID-19 reported in different animal species, part of an interactive COVID data tracking dashboard rendered by Complexity Science Hub Vienna. The drawings represent the type of animal, including both domestic and wild; the size of the bubbles reflects the number of cases in each locale. Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Complexity Science Hub Vienna/Screenshot by NPR

A researcher holds a Northern long eared bat in Shenandoah National Park in Virginia. Nick Kalen / Virginia Tech hide caption

toggle caption
Nick Kalen / Virginia Tech

A Tale Of Two Parks And The Bats Within Them

Buckle up! Short Wave is going on a road trip every Friday this summer. In this first episode of our series on the research happening in the National Parks System, we head to Shenandoah National Park and the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Some bats there are faring better than others against white-nose syndrome, a fungus that has killed more than 7 million bats in the last decade. Today — what researchers like Jesse De La Cruz think is enabling some bat species to survive.

A Tale Of Two Parks And The Bats Within Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1115781416/1115832969" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A band of wild horses on a mountainside near the Soda Mountain Wilderness area. Photo Courtesy of: Wild Horse Fire Brigade - a non-profit organization hide caption

toggle caption
Photo Courtesy of: Wild Horse Fire Brigade - a non-profit organization

Wild Horses Could Keep Wildfire At Bay

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110474146/1114388595" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A captured merlin is held near Lake Michigan on June 27 near Glen Arbor, Mich., where it will be fitted with a leg band and tracking device. The mission will enhance knowledge of a species still recovering from a significant drop-off caused by pesticides and help wildlife managers determine how to prevent merlins from attacking endangered piping plovers. John Flesher/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Flesher/AP

Researchers caught a Greenland shark off the coast of Belize in April, the first reported sighting of the species in the western Caribbean. The shark is typically found in the Arctic and at depths of up to 7,000 feet below the ocean surface. Devanshi Kasana hide caption

toggle caption
Devanshi Kasana

An illustration of Qikiqtania wakei (center) in the water with its larger cousin, Tiktaalik roseae. Alex Boersma hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Boersma

This fish evolved to walk on land — then said 'nope' and went back to the water

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114587652/1114600598" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sue Bell holds one of more than a dozen beagles that arrived at the headquarters of animal rescue group Homeward Trails in Fairfax Station, Va., on Thursday, while posing for a portrait. The dogs were a small portion of the roughly 4,000 beagles rescued from a research facility where the conditions were found to be inhumane. Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR

A Bengal tiger rests in the jungles of Bannerghatta National Park south of Bangalore, India, on July 29, 2015. The number of tigers in the wild has gone up 40% since 2015 — largely because of improvements in monitoring them, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Aijaz Rahi/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Aijaz Rahi/AP

Pakistani breeder Hasan Narejo displays the ears of his baby goat Simba, in Karachi on July 6. The kid's ears have gone viral, attracting praise — and trolls. Asif Hassan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Asif Hassan/AFP via Getty Images

Falcolner Ricky Ortiz poses with Pac-Man, a Harris's hawk, at the El Cerrito del Norte BART station in El Cerrito, Calif. Raquel Maria Dillon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Raquel Maria Dillon/NPR

The key to this California train station's pigeon problem? A hawk named Pac-Man

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1112219559/1112219560" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Environmental research students Valérie Bolduc and Jaynina Deku review test photos from motion-activated cameras they have installed around a water culvert to monitor wildlife. Emma Jacobs hide caption

toggle caption
Emma Jacobs

Sand tiger sharks can grow to up to 10 feet in length, but juveniles average 3 to 5 feet. These sharks have a menacing appearance, but aren't known for unprovoked attacks on humans. Loic Venance/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Loic Venance/AFP via Getty Images
Screenshot / TED

Marlene Zuk: What humans can learn from the sex lives of insects

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111536611/1111676632" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
James Duncan Davidson/James Duncan Davidson / TED

Carin Bondar: Eggs and the genius of bird moms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111534286/1111676421" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

These canines are some of the nearly 500 beagles that Homeward Trails Animal Rescue collected earlier this year from an Envigo research facility in Virginia. Now Homeward Trails is taking in additional beagles from Envigo, which bred the dogs for pharmaceutical research, after a federal judge ordered thousands of remaining dogs to be released. Homeward Trails Animal Rescue hide caption

toggle caption
Homeward Trails Animal Rescue