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Dr. Nicole Scott, the residency program director at Indiana's largest teaching hospital, is worried what the near-total ban on abortion in the state means for her hospital's ability to recruit and retain the best doctors. Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media

The monkeypox outbreak is growing in the U.S. and vaccines remain in short supply. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

With supplies low, FDA authorizes plan to stretch limited monkeypox vaccine doses

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Vision divine du 11 Mars 1948, is a series of eight drawings by Ivoirian artist Frédéric Bruly Bouabré. They depict a vision that Bouabré said he experienced that year: "seven colored suns" creating a "circle of beauty around their 'mother-sun.' " This piece and other works from Bouabré are part of an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art. The Museum of Modern Art hide caption

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The Museum of Modern Art

Research shows that expanded access to preventive care and coverage has led to an increase in colon cancer screenings, vaccinations, use of contraception and chronic disease screenings. Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm

Demonstrators outside PhRMA headquarters in Washington, D.C., protest lobbying by pharmaceutical companies to keep Medicare from negotiating lower prescription drug prices. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Elizabeth and James Weller at their home in Houston two months after losing their baby due to a premature rupture of membranes. Elizabeth could not receive the medical care she needed until several days later because of a Texas law that banned abortion after six weeks. Julia Robinson/NPR hide caption

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Julia Robinson/NPR

Abortion Laws in Texas are Disrupting Maternal Care

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Abortion rights activists march from Washington Square Park to Bryant Park in protest of the overturning of Roe v. Wade by the U.S. Supreme Court. The march was in New York on June 24, 2022. ALEX KENT/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ALEX KENT/AFP via Getty Images

Criminalization of pregnancy has already been happening to the poor and women of color

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A team of volunteers with an Ohio-based nonprofit handed out 2,500 doses of a nasal spray version of naloxone, an overdose reversal drug, at this year's Bonnaroo music festival. Amy Harris/Invision via AP hide caption

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Amy Harris/Invision via AP

Tennessee's Medicaid program, TennCare, dropped Katie Lester and her son Mason (right), because of a clerical error in 2019. The Lester family was left uninsured for most of the next three years, including during the birth of youngest child Memphis (left). Brett Kelman/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Brett Kelman/Kaiser Health News

Labor member for Solomon, Luke Gosling introduces the Restoring Territory Rights Bill in the House of Representatives at Parliament House in Canberra, Australia, Monday, Aug. 1, 2022. Mick Tsikas/AP hide caption

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Mick Tsikas/AP

The Biden administration plans to offer updated booster shots in the fall. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Summer boosters for people under 50 shelved in favor of updated boosters in the fall

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Lucille Brooks, a retiree who lives in Pittsford, New York, was sued in 2020 for nearly $8,000 by a nursing home that had taken care of her brother. The nursing home dropped the case after she showed she had no control over his money or authority to make decisions for him. Heather Ainsworth for KHN hide caption

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Heather Ainsworth for KHN

Nursing homes are suing friends and family to collect on patients' bills

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Insurers are complying with federal rules aimed at price transparency that took effect July 1, but consumer use of the data may have to wait until private firms synthesize it. DNY59/Getty Images hide caption

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People enter a One Medical office on July 21 in Oakland, Calif. Amazon's plans to buy the company will give it a greater physical presence in health care. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Brittany Mostiller, former executive director of the Chicago Abortion Fund, said the fund's financial support prevented her from taking more drastic actions she'd considered when she found out she was pregnant. Armando L. Sanchez/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Armando L. Sanchez/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

EVERETT, WA -­ JUNE 24, 2022: Photos of the late Michael Alcayaga, Kristi Alcayaga's son, with his three siblings at their home on Friday, June 24, 2022, in Everett, Wash. Alcayaga's teenage son, Michael, had leukemia and was able to try a new drug, Clofarabine, through the accelerated approvals process. Michael died on May 20, 2014, a few weeks after his 16th birthday. Jovelle Tamayo/Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo/Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

The future of abortion remains highly uncertain in Michigan. At the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, the student health center has been preparing for all possible scenarios, from a complete statewide ban on abortion to less extreme changes. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Colleges navigate confusing legal landscapes as new abortion laws take effect

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