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Grape vines at Korbel vineyards are submerged under floodwater Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, near Guerneville, Calif. The Central Valley produces $17 billion worth of crops every year. (AP Photo/Ben Margot) Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

This photo provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows a blacklegged tick, also known as a deer tick, a carrier of Lyme disease. James Gathany/AP hide caption

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James Gathany/AP

Tick Check! The Tiny Bloodsuckers In Our Backyards

Short Wave is going outside every Friday this summer! In this second episode of our series on the National Parks System, we head to Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas. Among the trees and trails, researchers like Adela Oliva Chavez search for blacklegged ticks that could carry Lyme disease. She's looking for answers as to why tick-borne illnesses like Lyme disease are spreading in some parts of the country and not others. Today: What Adela's research tells us about ticks and the diseases they carry, and why she's dedicated her career to understanding what makes these little critters... tick.

Tick Check! The Tiny Bloodsuckers In Our Backyards

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Patricia Neves (left) and Ana Paula Ano Bom helped launch a global project to revolutionize access to mRNA technology. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

A conceptual illustration of a double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule with mutation in a gene. Kateryna Kon/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

A band of wild horses on a mountainside near the Soda Mountain Wilderness area. Photo Courtesy of: Wild Horse Fire Brigade - a non-profit organization hide caption

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Photo Courtesy of: Wild Horse Fire Brigade - a non-profit organization

Wild Horses Could Keep Wildfire At Bay

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An illustration of Qikiqtania wakei (center) in the water with its larger cousin, Tiktaalik roseae. Alex Boersma hide caption

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Alex Boersma

This fish evolved to walk on land — then said 'nope' and went back to the water

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The science is in: Everyone recognizes and uses baby talk with infants

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What looks much like craggy mountains on a moonlit evening is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals previously obscured areas of star birth. NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI hide caption

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NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI

Drugmaker HRA Pharma has asked the Food and Drug Administration to approve an over-the-counter birth control pill called Opill. The agency's review process is estimated to take about 10 months. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Marine archaeologist James Delgado, left, and beachcomber Craig Andes, right, examine one of the larger shipwreck timbers removed from sea caves off the northern Oregon coast. Andes discovered the timbers. Katie Frankowicz/KMUN hide caption

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Katie Frankowicz/KMUN

A cast of the Buesching mastodon at the University of Michigan. Eric Bronson/Michigan Photography hide caption

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Eric Bronson/Michigan Photography

The story of Fred the mastodon, who died looking for love

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When confronted with a spider-like 3-D model, jumping spiders freeze and back away slowly, especially if the model has eyes. Daniela Roessler hide caption

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Daniela Roessler

Brachycephalus ephippium. Pumpkin toadlets are native to neotropical rainforests along the Atlantic coast of southeastern Brazil. Walter StaebleinGetty Images hide caption

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Walter StaebleinGetty Images

Against All Odds, The Pumpkin Toadlet Is

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A woodcut from the 15th century depicts a scene from the Black Death plague, which killed an estimated 50 million people in Europe and the Mediterranean between 1346 and 1353. Scientists say they may have found the origin of this deadly disease. Pictures from History/Universal Images Group /Getty Images hide caption

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Pictures from History/Universal Images Group /Getty Images

Abortion-rights protesters regroup and protest following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, federally protected right to abortion, outside the Supreme Court in Washington on June 24, 2022. The Supreme Court has ended constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place nearly 50 years, a decision by its conservative majority to overturn the court's landmark abortion cases. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

The Public Health Implications Of Overturning Roe V. Wade

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People line up outside of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on June 23, as the city makes vaccines available to residents possibly exposed to monkeypox. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Monkeypox outbreak in U.S. is bigger than the CDC reports. Testing is 'abysmal'

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