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A self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover on Vera Rubin Ridge. AP hide caption

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AP

What a decade of Curiosity has taught us about life on Mars

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A Soyuz spacecraft docked to the International Space Station in April 2014. Terry Virts/NASA hide caption

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Terry Virts/NASA

To this retired commander, the ISS was the last good bond between the U.S. and Russia

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When the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai volcano erupted on Jan. 15, it sent the equivalent of more than 58,000 Olympic-size swimming pools' worth of water into the stratosphere, researchers say. Tonga Geological Services hide caption

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Tonga Geological Services

Mauna Kea is considered sacred to Native Hawaiians. It also happens to be ideal for observatories. Andrew Richard Hara/W. M. Keck Observatory hide caption

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Andrew Richard Hara/W. M. Keck Observatory

A jacket worn by astronaut Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin on the historic first mission to the moon's surface in 1969, was sold for nearly $2.8 million at auction. Courtesy of Sotheby's via AP hide caption

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Courtesy of Sotheby's via AP

U.S. Space Shuttle Commander Terrence Wilcutt (right) and Mir Commander Anatoly Solovyev hug after opening the hatches between the space shuttle Endeavour and the Russian Space station Mir Saturday, Jan. 24, 1998, in this image from television NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

NASA engineer Ernie Wright looks on as the first flight-ready mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope are prepared to undergo testing. David Higginbotham/NASA, MSFC hide caption

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David Higginbotham/NASA, MSFC

You can find the tech behind the Webb telescope down here on Earth

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Captured in infrared light by NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals for the first time previously invisible areas of star birth. NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI hide caption

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NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

Alt text helps the visually impaired experience the James Webb Telescope images

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Anuj Shrestha for NPR

COMIC: How living on Mars time taught me to slow down

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As the first James Webb Space Telescope images appeared in New York's Times Square and everywhere else, scientists got to work diving deep into the data. Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images

In this composite image provided by NASA, the SDO satellite captures the path sequence of the transit of Venus across the face of the sun on June 5-6, 2012 as seen from space. The next pair of events will not happen again until the year 2117 and 2125. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

Venus And The 18th Century Space Race

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Some of the expanse captured by the James Webb telescope. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

There were 344 ways the Webb telescope could fail after launch — it still succeeded

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Then-NASA Deputy Associate Administrator Gregory Robinson stands with other officials to watch a spacecraft launch at Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in September 2016. NASA via Getty Images hide caption

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NASA via Getty Images

How the son of sharecroppers helped send the world's most powerful telescope to space

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What looks much like craggy mountains on a moonlit evening is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals previously obscured areas of star birth. NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI hide caption

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NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI

This image released by NASA on Tuesday, July 12, 2022, combined the capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope's two cameras to create a never-before-seen view of a star-forming region in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), this combined image reveals previously invisible areas of star birth. NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI via AP hide caption

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NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI via AP
Stocktrek/Getty Images

Making Space Travel Accessible For People With Disabilities

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The bright star at the center of NGC 3132, Southern Nebula Ring, while prominent when viewed by NASA's Webb Telescope in near-infrared light, plays a supporting role in sculpting the surrounding nebula. A second star, barely visible at lower left along one of the bright star's diffraction spikes, is the nebula's source. It has ejected at least eight layers of gas and dust over thousands of years. NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI hide caption

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NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI

The James Webb Space Telescope (shown here being tested on earth) is expected to reveal some of the most spectacular views of the Universe ever seen. Chris Gunn/Northrop Grumman, NASA hide caption

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Chris Gunn/Northrop Grumman, NASA

NASA's James Webb telescope reveals the universe as we've never seen it before

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