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Nikki Cox faced possible eviction this summer after her work hours were cut, and then she lost three weeks of pay after getting COVID-19. Via Nikki Cox hide caption

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Via Nikki Cox

'We have nowhere to go': Many face eviction during a crisis in affordable housing

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Heat advisories have been issued throughout central Texas this week. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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Homeownership feels out of reach for many Americans. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

As interest rates rise, the 'American dream' of homeownership fades for some

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Housing activists in Swampscott, Mass., on Oct. 14, 2020. A congressional report finds that four corporate landlords acted aggressively to push out tenants during the first year of the pandemic, despite a federal eviction moratorium and billions in emergency rental aid. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

Corporate landlords used aggressive tactics to push out more tenants than was known

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What you need to know about preparing financially for a baby

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Tesla has pulled back from its $1.5 billion investment in Bitcoin, which it announced in early 2021. Here, a Bitcoin ATM is seen last year inside a New York City store. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Contractors work on the roof of a house under construction in Louisville, Ky. A new study shows the U.S. is 3.8 million homes short of meeting housing needs. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

There's a massive housing shortage across the U.S. Here's how bad it is where you live

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Allie Sullberg for NPR

A worker at a Subway sandwich shop makes a tuna sandwich last year in San Anselmo, California. A lawsuit in federal court accuses the restaurant giant of not using 100% tuna in its offerings — and a judge has denied Subway's request to dismiss the suit. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeni Rae Peters and daughter embrace at their home in Rapid City, S.D. In 2020, Peters was diagnosed with stage 2 breast cancer. After treatment, Peters estimates that her medical bills exceeded $30,000. Dawnee LeBeau for NPR hide caption

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Dawnee LeBeau for NPR

She was already battling cancer. Then she had to fight the bill collectors

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The Federal Reserve is raising interest rates to combat inflation. It's having a trickle-down effect, resulting in higher mortgage rates, an increase in credit card interest and more. There are steps you can take to improve your financial situation as prices continue to climb. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP
Suriyo Hmun Kaew/EyeEm/Getty Images

Simple DIY maintenance tasks that will keep your car running smoothly — and save money

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Johnny Navarro sits on the hood of his recently purchased 2014 Lexus. Johnny Navarro hide caption

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Johnny Navarro

Monthly car payments have crossed a record $700. What that means

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Oona Tempest/KHN

How to get rid of medical debt — or avoid it in the first place

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Ari and TR Brooks stood on the land where their new home would be built the day they agreed to buy it back in February of 2021. But the home is still not completed and mortgage rates have risen dramatically. TR Brooks hide caption

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TR Brooks

The pain of rising mortgage rates when you're waiting for your home to be built

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President Joe Biden delivered remarks at an event in the Port of Los Angeles, touching on inflated gas prices. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

What's causing inflation? One expert walks through some of the factors

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The flooding of the Saint John River in 2019 marks the second consecutive year of major flooding. Marc Guitard/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Guitard/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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A gold plated souvenir cryptocurrency Tether (USDT) coin arranged beside a screen displaying US dollar notes. JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images

Brandon Schwedes of Port Orange, Fla., with his 11-year-old daughter and 8-year-old son. Schwedes had to move this year when the landlord dramatically raised the rent, then was outbid before finding another place he could afford. Brandon Schwedes hide caption

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Brandon Schwedes

The housing market squeeze pushes renters into bidding wars

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