Editors' Picks A selection of stories handpicked by NPR Music editors.

Editors' Picks

Detail view of Wendy Smith's cover art for Distant Plastic Trees, The Magnetic Fields' debut album, on which the song "100,000 Fireflies" was released in 1991. Wendy Smith/Courtesy of Merge Records hide caption

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Wendy Smith/Courtesy of Merge Records

Olivia Rodrigo performs "good 4 u" during the MTV Video Music Awards on Sept. 12, 2021. John Shearer/MTV VMAs 2021/Getty Images for MTV/ViacomCBS hide caption

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John Shearer/MTV VMAs 2021/Getty Images for MTV/ViacomCBS

Kacey Musgraves, whose follow-up to her Album of the Year-winning Golden Hour, titled Star-Crossed, was released Sep. 10, 2021. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Kacey Musgraves: 'Star-Crossed' And Thriving

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Kanye West is seen at a Donda listening event at Mercedes-Benz Stadium on July 22, 2021 in Atlanta, Georgia. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Universal Music hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Universal Music

Occasionally, a woman artist will make it her mission to speak as the monster others fear her to be, turning shame into strength. That's the power of Kate Bush's The Dreaming. Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of EMI Records hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of EMI Records

John Coltrane, photographed performing at The Penthouse during a run of performances in Seattle, Wash. in 1965. A recording of one, long lost, is now being released as A Love Supreme: Live in Seattle. Chuck Stewart/Courtesy Universal Music Group hide caption

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Chuck Stewart/Courtesy Universal Music Group

John Coltrane's Masterpiece Breathes New Life With 'A Love Supreme: Live In Seattle'

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Chucky Thompson speaks at a Recording Academy event in January 2009. The late producer created some of the most celebrated hits of the '90s "hip-hop soul" era. Joe Kohen/WireImage for NARAS/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Kohen/WireImage for NARAS/Getty Images

On Muthaland, bbymutha's songs play out as if she's rebuilding her confidence in real time. Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr, Amna Ijaz/NPR; Courtesy of The Muthaboard hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr, Amna Ijaz/NPR; Courtesy of The Muthaboard

"I believe that the body and the mind and the spirit have to be completely aligned in order for extreme joy to be realized," says Torres' Mackenzie Scott. Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

Haitian-American rapper Mach-Hommy released his latest album, Pray For Haiti, on May 21. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Amid Haiti's Upheaval, Rapper Mach-Hommy Sees The Country's Resiliency In Focus

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In "Side Street," a promotional video for his new album Call Me If You Get Lost, Tyler, The Creator plays out a fantasy version of a narrative that appears on the album's climactic song, "Wilshire," in which he engages in a deep but doomed emotional affair with the girlfriend of one of his friends. Courtesy of the artist/Screen shot from YouTube hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist/Screen shot from YouTube

Gente de Zona's "Patria y Vida" (pictured, right: Randy Malcom in Miami) reclaims a slogan made popular at the birth of the Cuban revolution, "Patria o Muerte" (Homeland or Death), 62 years ago. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

In a time when facts are political, Amarante thinks "maybe theater, drama, can be remembered as a vehicle to reflect a truth." Jessica Pons for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Pons for NPR

Rodrigo Amarante And His Great Musical Tantrum

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Alice Coltrane, widow of jazz great John Coltrane, playing the piano in her California home, in front of a portrait of her late husband. Despite having practiced music since a very early age, Alice Coltrane's work only somewhat recently began to be recognized. J.Emilio Flores/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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J.Emilio Flores/Corbis via Getty Images