Editors' Picks A selection of stories handpicked by NPR Music editors.

Editors' Picks

Hearing Tiger Trap's self-titled debut, released in 1993, was a turning point for writer Maria Sherman. "Tiger Trap's tender pop was punk in a hushed tone," she says. "I was, and remain, hooked." Photo Illustration: Renee Klahr/NPR; Courtesy of Michael Galinsky hide caption

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Photo Illustration: Renee Klahr/NPR; Courtesy of Michael Galinsky

Sinead O'Connor performs at August Hall in San Francisco, Calif., in February 2020. Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images

Sinéad O'Connor Has A New Memoir ... And No Regrets

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On a Brooklyn street in September 1971, a sea of fists greets the caskets of several of the incarcerated men killed in the violent clash at Attica Correctional Facility that month. Charles Frattini/NY Daily News via Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Frattini/NY Daily News via Getty Images

Daddy's Home (out May 14), Annie Clark's sixth album as St. Vincent, takes the sounds and sleaze of early-1970s New York as its aesthetic backdrop. Zackery Michael/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Zackery Michael/Courtesy of the artist

PJ Harvey's Uh Huh Her was a powerful force for critic Laura Snapes. "Seeing this woman I so admired derail a linear path to greater success and greater approval – the de facto path as far as teachers were concerned – was revelatory," she writes. Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR/Getty Images

With Vulture Prince, Aftab exercises the belief that there's a way for artists to make a statement using their work's own subtlety and grace. Diana Markosian/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Diana Markosian/Courtesy of the artist

On 'Vulture Prince,' Arooj Aftab Finds New Meaning In Familiar Words

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Fans with a photo of Selena during a ceremony honoring her in 2017. Over the decades since her death, Selena's legacy has become even more profound than writer Deborah Paredez ever anticipated. AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images

Miko Marks' latest album is Our Country. Throughout her career, she's deepened her connection to her ancestors while elaborating on the possibilities of all the styles that speak to her. Beto Lopez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Beto Lopez/Courtesy of the artist

Laurie Anderson, an artist and performer whose work spans disciplines, channels her emotional past into transformative art. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Catching Up With Laurie Anderson, An Artist Always Ahead Of Her Time

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Taylor Swift, onstage during the Fearless Tour at Madison Square Garden on Aug. 27, 2009 in New York. Swift released a re-recorded version of her 2008 album Fearless on April 9, 2021. Jason Kempin/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Kempin/Getty Images

In the past year, Joy Oladokun has been tapped for visibility-boosting initiatives, performed on late-night shows and had her songs placed on primetime TV. Noah Tidmore/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Noah Tidmore/Courtesy of the artist

"Queer people love country music," singer-songwriter Brandi Carlile says. "... We just don't think that it's going to open its doors to us. And when it does, it's wildly satisfying." Austin Hargrave/AUGUST hide caption

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Austin Hargrave/AUGUST

Singer Brandi Carlile Talks Ambition, Avoidance And Finally Finding Her Place

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Rana Sulaiman Halo (center), performs with a traditional daf drum with the Ashti (Peace) Choir. Emily Garthwaite/INSTITUTE for NPR hide caption

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Emily Garthwaite/INSTITUTE for NPR

'We Will Never Break': In Iraq, A Yazidi Women's Choir Keeps Ancient Music Alive

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Across Haram, an Islamic term meaning "forbidden," the rappers billy woods and ELUCID dissect all things taboo, and how, ultimately, those commodities are still ubiquitous across cultures. Alexander Richter/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alexander Richter/Courtesy of the artist

Myra Melford at Jazz at Lincoln Center © Frank Stewart/JALC hide caption

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© Frank Stewart/JALC

Myra Melford's Myriad Sounds

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John Prine, Jerry Jeff Walker, Billy Joe Shaver and Tony Rice are celebrated in this Mountain Stage special. Vasilia Scouras/Mountain Stage Archives hide caption

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Vasilia Scouras/Mountain Stage Archives

A Hole In Our Hearts: Live Performances By Musicians We Lost In 2020

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