Editors' Picks A selection of stories handpicked by NPR Music editors.

Editors' Picks

Tony Malaby, photographed in the fall of 2021, underneath the New Jersey Turnpike. Randy Thaler hide caption

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Randy Thaler

Saxophonist Tony Malaby's unlikely pandemic practice space: the New Jersey Turnpike

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The Beatles on Mount Doom (or a still from Peter Jackson's Get Back, a documentary constructed from footage shot during the making of the band's last studio albums and final performance). Linda McCartney/Apple Corps Ltd. hide caption

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Linda McCartney/Apple Corps Ltd.

Radiohead circa 2000. Singer Thom Yorke (second from right) says that as much as the albums Kid A and Amnesiac channel the dread that loomed over their moment, they are also full of hope that another world is possible. Tom Sheehan/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Tom Sheehan/Courtesy of the artist

Listen to Throughline's Radiohead episode, 'History Is Over'

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Strata-East Records founders, from left: Trumpeter Charles Tolliver and pianist Stanley Cowell, photographed in 1970. David Redfern/Redferns/Getty hide caption

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David Redfern/Redferns/Getty

Strata-East at 50: How a revolutionary record label put control in artists' hands

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Paramore's Brand New Eyes is earnest in its expression, like someone proud of having chosen the right words for what they wanted to say. Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Fueled by Ramen hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Fueled by Ramen

Dave Grohl performs onstage during the taping of the 2021 "Vax Live" fundraising concert at the in Inglewood, Calif. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

Dave Grohl retraces his life-affirming path from Nirvana to Foo Fighters

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Yoko Ono's Plastic Ono Band is centered on her unique and powerful voice; even decades after its release, it still sounds utterly fearless. Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Apple Records hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Apple Records

Joan Wasser turned a prolific session-player career into her own band, Joan as Police Woman. Her latest album, The Solution Is Restless, began as a marathon jam with Afrobeat innovator Tony Allen. Giles Clement/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Giles Clement/Courtesy of the artist

Adele sings in front of Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles during a televised concert to promote her fourth album, 30, which chronicles the aftermath of her divorce in ways that take subtle chances with the star's signature cathartic style. Cliff Lipson/Getty Images hide caption

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Cliff Lipson/Getty Images

Santigold's self-titled debut combines "look what I can do" attitude with a galvanizing magic. Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Downtown Records hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR; Getty Images; Courtesy of Downtown Records