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Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley speaks during a briefing with Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin in September at the Pentagon in Washington. The top U.S. military officer met with his Russian counterpart Wednesday Sept. 22, 2021 in Helsinki, Finland. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

A Top U.S. Military Officer Talks Counterterrorism Support With His Russian Counterpart

The meeting between Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, and his Russian counterpart in Finland comes at a crucial time in the wake of the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.

A community of young investors on TikTok, including @ceowatchlist, @quicktrades and @irisapp, are using House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's stock trading disclosures as inspiration for where to invest themselves. One user called Pelosi the market's "biggest whale," while another called her the "queen of investing." @ceowatchlist; @quicktrades; @irisapp/TikTok hide caption

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@ceowatchlist; @quicktrades; @irisapp/TikTok

TikTokers Are Trading Stocks By Copying What Members Of Congress Do

Online stock trading has taken off, bolstered by easy apps and lower prices. Now, a community of young investors have a new strategy: Looking for stock tips from members of Congress.

A memorial to missing and murdered Indigenous women is set up in St. Paul, Minn. Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The Media's Fascination With The Petito Case Looks Like Racism To Some Native Americans

Wyoming Public Radio

Media coverage around the death of 22-year-old Gabby Petito looks racist to those who note that murders and disappearances of Native Americans are mostly ignored.

Media Fascination With The Petito Mystery Looks Like Racism To Some Native Americans

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Close up of hands holding a pamphlet at the Pentagon during a Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, and Transgender Pride Month event. DOD photo by U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley. 2015. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

LGBTQ Vets Who Were Discharged Under 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Will Have A New Chance For Benefits

The new guidance will apply to veterans who were forced from service under the policy and given "other than honorable discharges" due to their sexual orientation, gender identity or HIV status.

Dr. Janet Woodcock, testifying here before Congress in July, has been serving as acting commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration since Jan. 20. Many public health leaders say letting the agency go so long without a permanent director has demoralized the staff and sends the wrong message about the agency's importance. Stefani Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AP

The FDA Has Been Without A Permanent Leader For 8 Months, As COVID Cases Climb

Kaiser Health News

Dr. Janet Woodcock, an administrative veteran of the Food and Drug Administration since the 1980s, has been acting director of the agency since January. Why is the permanent job so hard to fill?

The city of Austin has installed cameras that let residents see rising floodwaters at key intersections. It also has online maps of flooded areas, which TV newscasts sometimes show. Eddie Gaspar/KUT hide caption

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Eddie Gaspar/KUT

Texas Offers 4 Lessons For Staying Safe In Flash Floods

KUT 90.5

Over half of U.S. flood deaths happen on roads, a risk that's growing as a warmer climate fuels intense rain. Texas, home to "Flash Flood Alley," is using high- and low-tech ways to keep people safe.

Texas Offers 4 Lessons For Staying Safe In Flash Floods

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Different types of potatoes seed are seen displayed in "Parque de la Papa" or Potato Park, in Pisac, Peru. One hundred and fifty type of tubers from the Sacred Valley highlands are native to Peru. Martin Mejia/AP hide caption

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Martin Mejia/AP

If You Love Potatoes, Tomatoes Or Chocolate Thank Indigenous Latin American Cultures

These delicious treats were cultivated and enjoyed by native people for hundreds if not thousands of years. But with the arrival of the Spanish in Latin America, they were shared around the globe.

Video game maker Activision Blizzard said Tuesday that it is complying with a recent Securities and Exchange Commission subpoena sent to current and former employees and executives and the company itself on "employment matters and related issues." Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Activision Blizzard Now Faces 2 Investigations Over Alleged Discrimination As The SEC Opens Its Case

In late July, California's civil rights agency sued the video game company. In September, Activision Blizzard says it is complying with a recent subpoena from the Securities and Exchange Commission.

BTS sang (on a video viewed by more than 1 million). And they spoke. Left to right: Taehyung/V, Suga and Jin of the South Korean boy band at the launch of the U.N. General Assembly's 76th session on Sept. 20. John Angelillo /POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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John Angelillo /POOL/AFP via Getty Images

BTS Spoke At The U.N. General Assembly. And That's Not The Only Surprise

The appearance of the popular boy band from South Korea is one of many unexpected moments at the assembly — everything from a U.N. TikTok to a groundbreaking food summit.

Dion MBD for NPR

What Causes Long COVID Is A Mystery. Here's How Scientists Are Trying To Crack It

It's not clear why some people who get COVID-19 are plagued with symptoms for many months after being infected, but scientists are investigating what's behind these "long haul" cases.

What Causes Long COVID Is A Mystery. Here's How Scientists Are Trying To Crack It

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