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Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican, at this year's State of the State Address in Jefferson City, Mo., when he declared he would "uphold the will of the voters" in expanding Medicaid. He reversed course on Thursday. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Missouri Will Not Expand Medicaid Despite Voters' Wishes, Governor Says

Last year, Missouri voters approved a ballot measure to expand Medicaid. But Republican lawmakers refused to appropriate money to fund it. Now, a legal battle is all but certain.

President Biden and Vice President Harris meet with Republican Sens. Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia and Mike Crapo of Idaho to discuss an infrastructure bill in the Oval Office at the White House on Thursday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

No Deal Out Of Infrastructure Meeting, But Biden Says The Effort Is There

President Biden continues conversations with Republicans, but major hurdles persist over what items would be in an infrastructure measure, and how it might be paid for.

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Painful Endometriosis Could Hold Clues To Tissue Regeneration, Scientist Says

Fresh Air

MIT bioengineer Linda Griffith spent years in debilitating pain before she was diagnosed with a condition often neglected in research. Her focus on the basic biology could lead to better treatments.

Painful Endometriosis Could Hold Clues To Tissue Regeneration, Scientist Says

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Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas testifies before a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs hearing on the department's actions to address unaccompanied immigrant children on Thursday. Graeme Jennings/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Far Fewer Young Migrants Are In Border Patrol Custody, DHS Secretary Says

Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas told lawmakers that unaccompanied minors are moving more quickly out of custody and into facilities run by the Department of Health and Human Services.

Fuel holding tanks are seen at Colonial Pipeline's Linden Junction Tank Farm on May 10, 2021 in Woodbridge, N.J. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

How To Stop Ransomware Attacks? 1 Proposal Would Prohibit Victims From Paying Up

The attack on Colonial Pipeline has focused new attention on a potentially radical proposal to stem the growing threat posed by ransomware: making it illegal for victims to pay their attackers.

Tennessee State University could be due for a half-billion-dollar payout, according to recent findings that show the HBCU has been historically underfunded. Raymond Boyd/Getty Images hide caption

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Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

'Theft At A Scale That Is Unprecedented': Behind The Underfunding Of HBCUs

Tennessee could owe a historically Black university over $500 million. Andre Perry, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, believes the problem cuts much deeper: "We're throttling the economy."

'Theft At A Scale That Is Unprecedented': Behind The Underfunding Of HBCUs

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An untitled photo from 1956-57. Keïta, Seydou, Untitled #460, 1956–57. Copyright Seydou Keïta/SKPE—Courtesy CAAC—The Pigozzi Collection hide caption

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Keïta, Seydou, Untitled #460, 1956–57. Copyright Seydou Keïta/SKPE—Courtesy CAAC—The Pigozzi Collection

How The Sewing Machine Gave Power — And Fashion Cred — To African Women

In 'The African Lookbook,' Catherine McKinley bends, stretches and tears the fabric of what mainstream history has been telling us about African women in the clothing industry.

Pervis Staples, second from right, performing with his family in 1965. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Pervis Staples, Founding Member Of The Staple Singers, Dies At Age 85

Staples, a tenor vocalist, helped to ease his family's iconic gospel group into secular territory, and later found success as a manager and club owner.

Pervis Staples, Founding Member Of The Staple Singers, Dies At Age 85

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Retired Army Lt. Gen. Robert Caslen, pictured in 2014 when he was superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. On Wednesday he resigned as president of the University of South Carolina. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Mike Groll/AP

University Of South Carolina President Resigns After Plagiarizing Part Of Speech

The crowd gasped when Robert Caslen, a former Army flag officer, called the graduating students "the newest alumni from the University of California." But his bungled speech didn't stop there.

In a bid to get more Ohioans vaccinated, Gov. Mike DeWine announced a $1 million lottery offer to adults who get at least one COVID-19 dose. Kids under 18 who get the vaccine will be entered into a lottery to get a scholarship. Phil Long/AP hide caption

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Phil Long/AP

Ohio Wants To Make 5 People Millionaires — If They're Vaccinated

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine is pitching the $1 million lottery drawing and school scholarships as a scheme to boost vaccination levels in the state.

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