NPR - Breaking News, Analysis, Music, Arts & Podcasts Top stories in the U.S. and world news, politics, health, science, business, music, arts and culture. Nonprofit journalism with a mission. This is NPR.
Photograph by HuntImages/Getty; Collage by NPR

Dear Life Kit: My folks guilt-trip me into spending the holidays with them

Between long-held traditions, unfair expectations and clashing personalities, the holidays can be a perfect storm for conflict. Therapist John Kim helps untangle three holiday conundrums.

Dear Life Kit: My folks guilt-trip me into spending the holidays with them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139879986/1139960743" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Republican U.S. Rep-elect Mike Lawler, who eked out a narrow win in New York's Hudson Valley, has said he'd work closely with all members of the U.S. House, including progressive Democrats. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mary Altaffer/AP

Republicans won House seats in blue New York. Those wins could help shape Congress

A relative red wave in New York U.S. House races helped tip the balance of power in Congress. But several winners were moderate Republicans with little appetite for far-right provocation.

Republicans won House seats in blue New York. Those wins could help shape Congress

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139399457/1140441682" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Steve Lacy performs at The Fillmore Silver Spring in Maryland on Oct. 15, 2022. Kyle Gustafson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kyle Gustafson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

What's making us happy: A guide to your weekend listening, viewing and reading

Each week, the guests and hosts on NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour share what's bringing them joy. This week: Midwest Modern Twitter account, Unclear and Present Danger podcast, Gemini Rights and more.

Farmer Alex Millershaski watches the wind blow a handful of dry, sandy soil across one of his wheat fields. His county in southwest Kansas just experienced its driest October on record. David Condos/Kansas News Service hide caption

toggle caption
David Condos/Kansas News Service

National

From deadly wildfires to decimated harvests, this historically dry year left a mark across the U.S.

High Plains Public Radio

For the hardest hit areas, such as the Great Plains, recovering from the drought won't be easy.

Daddy Yankee helped build a global market for reggaeton — but he also illustrated how much political power the genre wields. Victor Bizar Gomez for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Victor Bizar Gomez for NPR

Daddy Yankee led reggaeton's global rise. As he bows out, the genre enters a new era

'The Big Boss' took a genre from working-class neighborhoods and turned it into a commercial powerhouse. But as the trailblazer retires, reggaeton meets a new moment for rebellion and experimentation.

Residents wearing masks wait at a public bus stop in Beijing on Saturday. Chinese authorities announced a further easing of COVID-19 curbs with major cities such as Shenzhen and Beijing no longer requiring negative tests to take public transport. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ng Han Guan/AP

Beijing and other cities in China end required COVID-19 tests for public transit

The slight relaxation of testing requirements comes follows protests across China by residents frustrated by the rigid enforcement of anti-virus restrictions.

Items from NPR Life Kit host Marielle Segarra's ancestral altar, clockwise from right: a Julio Iglesias cassette tape, an address book, a crucifix, a mango candy, a card with a rose depicted on it, eyeglass lenses and a ring. Malaka Gharib/ NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Malaka Gharib/ NPR

How to create an ancestral altar at home: A cross-cultural guide

Spiritual practitioners and Indigenous educators explain how to set up an special place to honor your loved ones.

How to create an ancestral altar at home: A cross-cultural guide

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1136051123/1136208144" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Health workers sit at a check-in table at a pop-up mpox vaccination clinic which opened today by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health at the West Hollywood Library on August 3, 2022 in West Hollywood, California. California Governor Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency on August 1st over the mpox outbreak. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Mpox will not be renewed as a public health emergency next year

Cases of Mpox, which was previously named monkeypox, peaked in August and fell steadily over the past months to a daily average of seven new cases by the end of November.

Alexis Mukwedi tested positive for sleeping sickness during a two-day mobile screening in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He had complained about nervous tics and fatigue. Xavier Vaheed-DNDi hide caption

toggle caption
Xavier Vaheed-DNDi

With one dose, new drug may cure sleeping sickness. Could it also wipe it out?

This often fatal disease found in many African countries is painful and lengthy to treat. But a single oral dose proved incredibly effective in a clinical trial, raising hopes of eradication.

Yoel Roth used to be Twitter's Head of Trust & Safety until he resigned in early November. He worries about the changes Elon Musk is making to the platform. David Odisho/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Odisho/Getty Images

Twitter's former safety chief warns Musk is moving fast and 'breaking things'

Yoel Roth was a top executive at Twitter, until he resigned in early November. He says people need to "very thoughtfully and carefully weigh the costs and benefits of using Twitter."

Twitter's former safety chief warns Musk is moving fast and "breaking things"

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140355862/1140441664" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A rare recording of Phinney's Rainbow — thought to be the first produced musical of Stephen Sondheim (shown here as a wizened showbiz veteran of 32, with three Broadway musicals under his belt) — has been found on a bookshelf in Milwaukee. Michael Hardy/Express/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Hardy/Express/Getty Images

A rare recording of a musical by an 18-year-old Stephen Sondheim surfaces

Broadway-legend-in-training Stephen Sondheim was a college sophomore in 1948 when his musical Phinney's Rainbow was produced — and recorded — at Williams College in Massachusetts.

From left, Greta Gerwig as Babette, Raffey Cassidy as Denise, May Nivola as Steffie, Sam Nivola as Heinrich and Adam Driver as Jack in White Noise. Netflix hide caption

toggle caption
Netflix

Director Noah Baumbach tackles misinformation in 'White Noise,' wryly

Film director Noah Baumbach speaks with NPR's Steven Inskeep about his latest film, "White Noise," based on the 1985 Don DeLillo novel of the same name

Director Noah Baumbach tackles misinformation in 'White Noise,' wryly

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139190228/1139190229" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Anish Adhikari, now 26, worked construction jobs in Qatar for 33 months in the lead-up to the World Cup. In this 2021 photo, he poses inside the new Lusail stadium, which he helped build and which will host the World Cup final on Dec. 18. Adhikari says the Nepali agent who got him the job misled him about working conditions in Qatar: "They sell a dream that's not reality." Anish Adhikari hide caption

toggle caption
Anish Adhikari

Death and dishonesty: Stories of two workers who built the World Cup stadiums in Qatar

Vinod Kumar of India and Anish Adhikari of Nepal are among the many migrant workers who helped build the stadiums. Adhikari says he was misled about working conditions. Kumar died on the job.

Death and dishonesty: Stories of two workers who built the World Cup stadiums in Qatar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1140260086/1140260087" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
more from