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Boat captain Emosi Dawai looks at the super-yacht Amadea where it is docked at the Queens Wharf in Lautoka, Fiji, on April 13, 2022. The super-yacht that American authorities say is owned by a Russian oligarch previously sanctioned for alleged money laundering has been seized by law enforcement in Fiji, the U.S. Justice Department announced May 5. Leon Lord/AP hide caption

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Leon Lord/AP

Before a Fiji court: Can the U.S. seize a Russian yacht in the South Pacific?

The case of a yacht detained in the South Pacific island nation is raising questions about how far U.S. jurisdiction extends.

Ima hugs Shakira at a shelter provided by the Nigerians Diaspora Organization in Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

They escaped the war in Ukraine. Then they faced fresh trouble in Poland

Millions of people have fled Ukraine since the war started, but not all are Ukrainian. And some citizens of African countries have found that the doors of Europe are much less open to them.

They escaped the war in Ukraine. Then they faced fresh trouble in Poland

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U.S. President Joe Biden, second from right, meets with Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, second from left, in the Oval Office of the White House on Nov. 18, 2021. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

U.S. adviser tries to talk Mexican president out of skipping Summit of the Americas

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador threatened to skip this year's summit in the United States if Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua are excluded.

U.S. adviser tries to talk Mexican president out of skipping Summit of the Americas

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A man wearing a face mask stands on a bridge over an expressway in Beijing, Thursday, May 19, 2022. Parts of Beijing on Thursday halted daily mass testing that had been conducted over the past several weeks, but many testing sites remained busy due to requirements for a negative COVID test in the last 48 hours to enter some buildings in China's capital. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Shanghai is expected to reopen some subways as it eases COVID restrictions

The lockdown of China's largest city has dealt a blow to the economy and frustrated residents.

A drawing from the War Toys project and Brian McCarty's photo that interprets that image. War Toys and Brian McCarty hide caption

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War Toys and Brian McCarty

A photographer uses toys to reflect children's experiences in war

Brian McCarty's nonprofit provides art therapy to kids who have escaped conflicts, then transforms some of their traumatic drawings into toy dioramas to help people understand the horrors of war.

A photographer uses toys to reflect children's experiences in war

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Russian army Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, is seen behind glass during a court hearing in Kyiv on Wednesday. He went on trial in Ukraine for the killing of an unarmed civilian and pleaded guilty. It is the first time a member of the Russian military has been prosecuted for a war crime since Russia invaded Ukraine in February. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Here's what happened Wednesday in the Russia-Ukraine war

A roundup of key developments and the latest in-depth coverage of Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

As police and FBI agents continue their investigation into the shooting at Tops Market in Buffalo, N.Y., last weekend, Congress is considering legislation to address domestic terrorism. Authorities say the attack was believed to be motivated by racial hatred. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Days after Buffalo mass shooting, the House approves a bill to fight domestic terror

The bill creates offices at DOJ, DHS, and the FBI to track domestic terror threats. GOP lawmakers argue it could allow federal officials to ensnare parents, a charge DOJ rejects.

Tyler Merfeld co-owns Toad Style BK in New York and says his restaurant was overwhelmed by the promotion. Manuela Lopez Restrepo/NPR hide caption

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Manuela Lopez Restrepo/NPR

Grubhub offered free lunches in New York City. That's when the chaos began

The food delivery service Grubhub launched a free lunch promotion for people in New York City. Spoiler alert: It backfired.

Grubhub offered free lunches in New York City. That's when the chaos began

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Naheed Phiroze Patel

'Mirror Made of Rain' looks at how patterns of self-destruction are inherited

Naheed Phiroze Patel's debut novel Mirror Made of Rain is out in the U.S. this week.

'Mirror Made of Rain' looks at how patterns of self-destruction are inherited

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In the metal bands Sleep and High on Fire, Matt Pike has always looked to esoteric sources. Over the last decade, however, he's found inspiration in the conspiracy theories of David Icke. Photo Illustration by Estefania Mitre/NPR; Getty Images hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Estefania Mitre/NPR; Getty Images

Can Matt Pike face the music?

Matt Pike overcame long odds to find success in metal bands Sleep and High on Fire. But his deepening obsession with conspiracy theories has created a dissonant riff.

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