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Clippings from the Great Falls Tribune were part of the Cascade County Sheriff's Office investigative file into the 1956 murders of Patricia Kalitzke and Lloyd Duane Bogle. Traci Rosenbaum/USA Today Network via Reuters Co. hide caption

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Traci Rosenbaum/USA Today Network via Reuters Co.

Detectives Just Used DNA To Solve A 1956 Double Homicide. They May Have Made History

It's one of the oldest criminal cases cracked with the new DNA technology. The murders of teen sweethearts Lloyd Duane Bogle and Patricia Kalitzke had gone unsolved for more than 60 years.

Tom Hanks recently wrote an essay in The New York Times urging more widespread teaching of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. The Oscar winner has built a career on movies about American white men doing the right thing. Steve Granitz/WireImage hide caption

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Steve Granitz/WireImage

Opinion: Tom Hanks Is A Non-Racist. It's Time For Him To Be Anti-Racist

TV critic Eric Deggans says the Oscar-winning actor whose career has been rooted in films based on U.S. history needs to take responsibility for helping dismantle the notion of white exceptionalism.

A humpback whale jumps in the surface of the Pacific Ocean at the Uramba Bahia Malaga National Natural Park in Colombia in 2018. Michael Packard says he was nearly swallowed by one such whale on Friday as he dove for lobsters off the coast of Provincetown Miguel Medina/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Medina/AFP via Getty Images

A Humpback Whale Scooped A Diver Up In Its Mouth - And Spat Him Back Out

Michael Packard says he was trapped in the whale's mouth for 30 to 40 seconds before it tossed him back in the water, bruised but otherwise unharmed. Experts tell NPR such events are extremely rare.

Apple announced this week at its Worldwide Developer Conference a new feature in its forthcoming operating system, iOS 15, that will digitize state-issued licensees and ID cards. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Apple iPhones Can Soon Hold Your ID. Privacy Experts Say There's A Cost For The Convenience

Apple announced a new feature to let users scan their driver's license and save it to their iPhones. Some experts says it could invite greater surveillance and data tracking, as well as incentivize businesses to ask customers to prove who they are.

Apple iPhones Can Soon Hold Your ID. Privacy Experts Are On Edge

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President Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrive on Air Force One at RAF Mildenhall in Suffolk on June 9 ahead of a series of summits and meetings in Europe. Joe Giddens/WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Giddens/WPA Pool/Getty Images

Biden's Summit With Putin Follows A Harrowing History Of U.S. Meetings With Russia

When Russia was still the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, summits with its leaders were largely about fears of a thermonuclear duel and mass annihilation. Here's a look back at the highlights.

Gold Crocs were Questlove's fashion statement at this year's Academy Awards in April. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Save The Stiletto Crocs For Happy Hour. The New Office Look Is 'Power Casual'

Some employees went without workplace staples like ties, heels and dress pants during the pandemic. But will those pieces make a fashion comeback as more people return to work?

The New Office Look Is 'Power Casual.' But Save The Stiletto Crocs For Happy Hour

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Dave Benscoter rediscovered the Iowa Flat and other apples by finding watercolor paintings like this commissioned by the USDA. U.S. Department of Agriculture hide caption

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U.S. Department of Agriculture

An Apple Detective Rediscovered 7 Kinds Of Apples Thought To Be Extinct

There are well-known types of detectives: narcotics, homicide, cyber. Add "rare apple," thanks to a Washington state retiree who recently rediscovered seven kinds, including the Almota and the Eper.

An Apple Detective Rediscovered 7 Kinds Of Apples Thought To Be Extinct

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A March 21 attack by the Assad regime forces and Iran-backed terrorist groups targeted a hospital in Aleppo, killing six civilians and injuring 15. Above: A view of the damaged site. Kasim Rammah/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Kasim Rammah/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Syria Bombs Hospitals. Now It Will Help Lead The World Health Organization

It was a decision that appalled and angered Syrian opposition groups and international medical organizations. On May 28 Syria was appointed to the World Health Organization's Executive Board.

The government of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is in a standoff with social media companies over what content gets investigated or blocked online, and who gets to decide. Bikas Das/AP hide caption

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Bikas Das/AP

India And Tech Companies Clash Over Censorship, Privacy And 'Digital Colonialism'

India's new social media rules give the government broad powers to block some content and break encryption. It's the latest in a standoff with tech companies over censorship, privacy and free speech.

India And Tech Companies Clash Over Censorship, Privacy And 'Digital Colonialism'

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Riz Ahmed at the 2021 Academy Awards. Handout/A.M.P.A.S. via Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/A.M.P.A.S. via Getty Images

Just 10% Of Popular Movies Had A Muslim Character. Riz Ahmed Wants To Change That

The Oscar-nominated actor is launching an initiative on Muslim representation in movies, after a new study showed less than 10% of the top films between 2017 and 2019 depicted Muslims on screen.

Just 10% Of Popular Movies Had A Muslim Character. Riz Ahmed Wants To Change That

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Participants sit a Blue Origin space simulator during a conference on robotics and artificial intelligence in Las Vegas on June 5, 2019. On Saturday, Blue Origin announced that an unidentified bidder will pay $28 million for a suborbital flight on the company's New Shepard vehicle. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

An 11-Minute Flight To Space With Jeff Bezos Was Just Auctioned For $28 Million

Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos is going up July 20 on a rocket made by his space exploration company Blue Origin. So is his brother. And now a mystery bidder has won an auction to join them.

As ransomware cases surge, the cyber criminals almost almost always demand, and receive, payment in cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. The world's largest meat supplier, JBS, announced paid $11 million in Bitcoin to hackers in a recent ransomware attack. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

Bitcoin Is Fueling Ransomware Attacks

If you're planning a multi-million dollar ransomware attack, there's really only one way to collect — with cryptocurrency. It's fast. It's easy. Best of all, it's largely anonymous and hard to trace.

How Bitcoin Has Fueled Ransomware Attacks

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A demonstrator holds a sign that reads "Palestinians for Black Power" during a protest in the streets of New York City in June 2020. Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images

The Complicated History Behind BLM's Solidarity With The Pro-Palestinian Movement

After the recent Israel-Hamas fighting, many Black Lives Matter organizers have renewed their support for the Palestinians. A fissure among African American activists in 1967 links the two movements.

The Complicated History Behind BLM's Solidarity With The Pro-Palestinian Movement

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Asha Gond (center right) rides her skateboard. When she first began skateboarding, neighbors would catcall that skateboarding is for boys and urge her parents to marry her off. Vicky Roy hide caption

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Vicky Roy

Skateboarding Gives Freedom To Rural Indian Teen In Netflix Film — And In Real Life

A new Netflix movie called Skater Girl chronicles the journey of an Indian teenage girl who discovers a life-changing passion for skateboarding. It's also the story of Asha Gond.

Crazy worms — an invasive species from Asia — pose a threat to forests, scientists say. The worms can thrash around so violently that they can jump out of a person's hand. They also lose their tail — on purpose. Josef Görres/Plant and Soil Science Department University of Vermont hide caption

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Josef Görres/Plant and Soil Science Department University of Vermont

'Crazy Worms' Threaten America's Trees — And (Gasp!) Our Maple Syrup

The invasive worms, which reproduce rapidly, are creating havoc in forests. They thrash around so violently that they can jump out of a person's hand. They also lose their tail — on purpose.

As COVID-19 rates go down and vaccination rates go up, New York City voters increasingly say that crime and public safety are their biggest concerns in the upcoming mayoral election. Scott Roth/AP hide caption

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Scott Roth/AP

Crime Is The Key Issue In New York City Mayor's Race

WNYC Radio

Mayor Bill de Blasio is out at the end of the year because of term limits. Voters will choose from a crowded field of would-be successors, including Andrew Yang, the former Democratic presidential candidate.

Crime Is The Key Issue In New York City Mayor's Race

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In this photo released by the Yunnan Forest Fire Brigade, a migrating herd of elephants graze near Shuanghe Township, Jinning District of Kunming city in southwestern China's Yunnan Province, on June 4. AP hide caption

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AP

China's Wandering Elephants Are On The Move Again. Are They Headed Home?

China's famed wandering elephants are on the move again, heading southwest. The direction of their travel could be a good sign, since authorities are hoping to lead them back to their original home.

Handy Kennedy, founder of AgriUnity cooperative, feeds his cows on HK Farms earlier this year in Cobbtown, Ga. The AgriUnity cooperative is a group of Black farmers formed to better their chances of economic success. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

U.S. Farmers Of Color Were About To Get Loan Forgiveness. Now The Program Is On Hold

A new federal program created by the Biden administration to reverse years of economic discrimination against U.S. farmers of color has ground to a halt.

U.S. and Chinese flags before the opening session of 2019 trade negotiations between U.S. and Chinese trade representatives in Beijing. On Thursday, China passed a sweeping new law designed to counter numerous sanctions the United States and the European Union have imposed on Chinese officials and major Chinese companies. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

China's New Anti-Foreign Sanctions Law Sends A Chill Through The Business Community

It's not clear how often or how broadly Beijing will use the law. But by complying with U.S. sanctions on China, businesses could face tough sanctions in China as a penalty for doing so.

China's New Anti-Foreign Sanctions Law Sends A Chill Through The Business Community

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How many oceans are there? It's National Geographic official now: There are five. Alexander Gerst/ESA via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Gerst/ESA via Getty Images

The World Now Has A Fifth Official Ocean

National Geographic has recognized the Southern Ocean as the fifth official ocean. The cartographic update doesn't surprise researchers who study the importance of the waters surrounding Antarctica.

Coming Soon To An Atlas Near You: A Fifth Ocean

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A Froggyland display shows taxidermized frogs doing what they do best: diving and swimming in a pool. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Welcome To Froggyland, The Croatian Taxidermy Museum That May Soon Come To The U.S.

The museum features the work of a Hungarian taxidermist who created anthropomorphized exhibits. It had 50,000 visitors in 2019, but numbers fell during the pandemic and the owner now plans to sell.

Welcome To Froggyland, The Croatian Taxidermy Museum That May Soon Come To The U.S.

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