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Guet N'dar, Senegal (October 7, 2022) - The neighborhood Khar Yalla, which means 'Waiting for God," in Wolof, was meant as a place for those who had been displaced by rising seas to live. But this neighborhood soon, too, was inundated with water. Ricci Shryock for NPR hide caption

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Ricci Shryock for NPR

Physicist Desiré Whitmore teaches workshops to help teachers better communicate science. As part of that, Desiré uses optical illusions to explain how social blind spots come into play in the classroom. Scott Barbour/Getty Images for NGV hide caption

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Scott Barbour/Getty Images for NGV

What physical blind spots can teach us about social blind spots

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People look at a dead gray whale at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, Calif., in May 2019, a year when 122 gray whales died in the U.S., according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Last year, 47 of the whales died. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Eye-popping egg prices have finally started to fall. Wholesale eggs in the Midwest market dropped by 58 cents to $3.29 a dozen at the end of January, according to USDA data. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Eggs prices drop, but the threat from avian flu isn't over yet

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Gas utilities and cooking stove manufacturers knew for decades that burners could be made that emit less pollution in homes, but they chose not to. That may may be about to change. Sean Gladwell/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gladwell/Getty Images

Gas stove makers have a pollution solution. They're just not using it

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Bobbi Wilson holds her collection of spotted lanternflies as she is honored at the Yale School of Public Health on Jan. 20. Andrew Hurley/Yale University hide caption

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Andrew Hurley/Yale University

Jupiter's moon Io, seen here in the infrared spectrum, courses with volcanic activity. Scientists are learning how the push and pull of gravity heats up this moon. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

From a green comet to cancer-sniffing ants, we break down the science headlines

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Yeshnee Naidoo prepares a "flow cell" for analysis by one of the center's many genetic sequencing machines. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Who's most likely to save us from the next pandemic? The answer may surprise you

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Each year, RSV infections send up to 80,000 kids under 5 to the hospital for emergency treatment. A new antibody treatment could protect the youngest kids — newborns and up infants up to 2 years old. Christoph Soeder/dpa/picture alliance via Getty I hide caption

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Christoph Soeder/dpa/picture alliance via Getty I

Computers have been used in rocketry for half-a-century, so it's possible to think that the new AI programs could help. They struggled to grasp the basics. NPR staff generated imagery using Midjourney hide caption

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NPR staff generated imagery using Midjourney

We asked the new AI to do some simple rocket science. It crashed and burned

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A researcher releases a bat after taking samples and inserting a microchip into it in Faridpur, Bangladesh. Fatima Tuj Johora for NPR hide caption

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Fatima Tuj Johora for NPR

Nipah: Using sticks to find a fatal virus with pandemic potential

The Nipah virus is on the World Health Organization's short list of diseases that have pandemic potential and therefore pose the greatest public health risk. With a fatality rate at about 70%, it is one of the most deadly respiratory diseases health officials have ever seen. But as regular outbreaks began in the early 2000s in Bangladesh, researchers were left scratching their heads. Initially, the cause of the outbreaks was unknown to them. But once they identified the virus, a second, urgent question arose: How was the virus jumping from bats into humans?

Nipah: Using sticks to find a fatal virus with pandemic potential

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IBRAHIM CHALHOUB/AFP via Getty Images

The ancient night sky and the earliest astronomers

Moiya McTier says the night sky has been fueling humans' stories about the universe for a very long time, and informing how they explain the natural world. In fact, Moiya sees astronomy and folklore as two sides of the same coin.

The ancient night sky and the earliest astronomers

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In this photo provided by the Department of Fire and Emergency Services, its members search for a radioactive capsule believed to have fallen off a truck being transported on a freight route on the outskirts of Perth, Australia, on Saturday. AP hide caption

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AP

A "mysterious" flying spiral spotted by the Subaru Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, early on Jan. 18, could be related to a SpaceX satellite launch earlier in the day, scientists speculated. NAOJ & Asahi Shimbun via Storyful/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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NAOJ & Asahi Shimbun via Storyful/Screenshot by NPR

A field researcher holds a male bat that was trapped in an overhead net as part of an effort to find out how the animals pass Nipah virus to humans. The animal will be tested for the virus, examined and ultimately released. Fatima Tuj Johora for NPR hide caption

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Fatima Tuj Johora for NPR

The Nipah virus has a kill rate of 70%. Bats carry it. But how does it jump to humans?

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Dr. Yejin Choi University of Washington Professor and MacArthur Fellow, works to improve AI's understanding of common sense. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation hide caption

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John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation