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Thousands of dancing fireflies in Japan create an enchanted forest. Photographer Kei Nomiyama has visited the Japanese island Shikoku every year since 2012 to capture the mesmerizing images of thousands of fireflies glowing in the forest. Kei Nomiyama/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Kei Nomiyama/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

The remains of a burned home are seen in the Indian Falls neighborhood of unincorporated Plumas County, California on July 26, 2021. Extreme weather events have claimed hundreds of lives worldwide in recent weeks, and upcoming forecasts for wildfire and hurricane seasons are dire. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

A wind farm in Wyoming generates electricity for a region that used to be more dependent on coal-fired power plants. A new study finds that millions of lives could be saved this century by rapidly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Matt Young/AP hide caption

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Matt Young/AP

Students wearing masks listen to teacher Dorene Scala during third grade summer school at Hooper Avenue School in Los Angeles, California. Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Ron Goode and Ray Gutteriez keep an eye on a burning sourberry bush. After the bushes are burned in the winter, they sprout again in the spring. Lauren Sommer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/NPR

A female Anopheles mosquito, a common vector for malaria, feeds on human skin. In a landmark study, researchers showed that genetically modified Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes could crash their own species in an environment mimicking sub-Saharan Africa, where the malaria-carrying mosquitoes spread. Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons

How An Altered Strand Of DNA Can Cause Malaria-Spreading Mosquitoes To Self-Destruct

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Tanzania's President Samia Suluhu Hassan receives her Johnson & Johnson vaccine against the coronavirus at the statehouse in Dar es Salaam on July 28. Her administration has reversed the government's anti-vaccination stance. Emmanuel Herman/Reuters hide caption

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Emmanuel Herman/Reuters

Map showing simulated floodwaters near Google's Sunnyvale campus. ESRI; NPR hide caption

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ESRI; NPR

Who Pays When Sea Levels Rise?

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A firefighter during night operations recently on the Bootleg fire in southern Oregon. inciweb.nwcg.gov hide caption

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inciweb.nwcg.gov

The Climate Change Link To More And Bigger Wildfires

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Sweating has allowed humans to survive, and thrive. Europa Press News/Europa Press via Getty Images hide caption

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Europa Press News/Europa Press via Getty Images

Sweat: A Human Superpower

Sweating is critical to helping humans avoid overheating, and it's different than how most animals cool down. Sarah Everts wanted to understand more about how humans came to sweat like we do, and wrote a book called The Joy of Sweat - which she talked about with Rhitu for this episode.

Sweat: A Human Superpower

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Volunteers fight a wildfire in northeastern Siberia on July 17th. Heat waves in the Russian Arctic and boreal forests have fueled intense, widespread blazes that can damage trees and release enormous amounts of stored carbon dioxide from forests and permafrost. Ivan Nikiforov/AP hide caption

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Ivan Nikiforov/AP

Climate Scientists Meet As Floods, Fires, Droughts And Heat Waves Batter Countries

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Aerial View of Dixie Valley Fault Lloyd Cluff/Getty Images hide caption

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Lloyd Cluff/Getty Images

Can We Predict Earthquakes? (Hint: No)

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Overhead irrigation of this newly planted crop of carrots is putting pressure on the available groundwater supplies in Cuyama, California. Located in the northeastern corner of Santa Barbara County, the sparsely populated and extremely arid Cuyama Valley has become an important agricultural region, producing such diverse crops as carrots, pistachios, lettuce, and wine grapes. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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George Rose/Getty Images

The Great California Groundwater Grab

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In Sydney, Australia, a clever cockatoo opens the lid of a trash bin using its bill and left foot. A second bird is observing it closely. Barbara Klump/Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior hide caption

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Barbara Klump/Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior

Oh Flock! Clever Cockatoos Are More Culturally Complex Than We Thought

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A medical assistant administers a coronavirus test last week in Los Angeles. COVID-19 cases are on the rise as the highly transmissible delta variant has become the dominant coronavirus strain in the United States. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images