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Speech therapist David Romero uses software to compose words with Teodoro Leazma, who suffered COVID-19. Leazma recovered his mobility, but then realized the illness caused him to have dyslexia and other cognitive disorders. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

How COVID-19 Affects The Brain

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In recent years, some in the medical community have started questioning the use of race in kidney medicine, arguing its use could perpetuate health disparities. FG Trade/Getty Images hide caption

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Should Black People Get Race Adjustments In Kidney Medicine?

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Dulles International Airport last month. The CDC will require all air passengers entering the U.S. to provide a negative COVID-19 test before boarding their flight. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Staff and residents of the Ararat Nursing Facility in the Mission Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles got COVID-19 shots on Jan. 7. Coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and deaths have been surging throughout Los Angeles County. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

An artist's rendering of the twin Mars Cube One (MarCO) spacecraft as they fly through deep space. The MarCOs will be the first CubeSats — a kind of modular, mini-satellite — attempting to fly to another planet. They're designed to fly along behind NASA's InSight lander on its cruise to Mars. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Two gorillas at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park (but not necessarily these two) tested positive for the coronavirus on Monday. A zoo statement says the apes have mild symptoms but are doing well. Christina Simmons/San Diego Zoo Global Archives hide caption

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Christina Simmons/San Diego Zoo Global Archives

Gitanjali Rao speaks onstage during The 2018 MAKERS Conference in Los Angeles, California. Rachel Murray/Getty Images for MAKERS hide caption

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Rachel Murray/Getty Images for MAKERS

This Teen Scientist Is TIME's First-Ever 'Kid Of The Year'

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In March 2018, a White House military aide carries the "football," a system that allows President Trump to launch a nuclear strike at any time. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
diane555/Getty Images

Micro Wave: What Makes Curly Hair Curl?

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Sun glancing off the surface of the blue glacial ice exposed at the Allan Hills Blue Ice Area, Antarctica. Ice cores containing trapped air from 2+ million years ago were discovered here in 2015-2016. The blue ice is exposed at the surface through a combination of glacial flow and ablation from the winds that blow year-round in the area. December 2015. John Higgins hide caption

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John Higgins

The Hunt For The World's Oldest Ice

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Jess Wade demonstrates how a tornado forms using a water bottle. Jess Wade hide caption

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Jess Wade

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

By day, Jess Wade is an experimental physicist at Imperial College London. But at night, she's a contributor to Wikipedia — where she writes entries about women and POC scientists. She chats with Emily Kwong about how Wikipedia can influence the direction of scientific research and why it's important to have entries about scientists from under-represented communities.

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

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Sybil Appell and her husband Stuart wait in line to receive a COVID-19 vaccine at the Lakes Regional Library on Dec. 30 in Fort Myers, Fla. There were 800 doses of vaccine available at the site. Octavio Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Octavio Jones/Getty Images

Why U.S. Vaccinations Started Slow And What We Know About The New Coronavirus Variant

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Health workers work in a lab at the Kawasaki City Institute for Public Health at the Kawasaki Innovation Gateway (KING) Skyfront in Kawasaki, Japan. David Mareui/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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David Mareui/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Keep Sharp, by Sanjay Gupta Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

To 'Keep Sharp' This Year, Keep Learning, Advises Neurosurgeon Sanjay Gupta

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Fear of having to go to the ER during a pandemic might have led kids with asthma to be more careful about regularly using their "controller" inhalers, researchers suspect. But that's likely only one factor in the decline in ER visits. PixelsEffect/Getty Images hide caption

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PixelsEffect/Getty Images

Ambulances are parked outside the NHS Nightingale hospital at the ExCeL center in east London on Friday. Hospitals in the U.K. are preparing for an influx of patients as the coronavirus continues to spread. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP via Getty Images

Crews observe the continuing eruption in Halema'uma'u at Kilauea in the early morning of Dec. 28. Overnight, the western vent in the wall of Halema'uma'u continued to erupt. D. Downs/USGS hide caption

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D. Downs/USGS

The U.S. is unlikely to meet its goal of vaccinating 20 million Americans by the end of the year, health officials said this week. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden delivers remarks on the ongoing coronavirus pandemic at the Queen Theater in Wilmington, Delaware. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

How Will Climate And Health Policy Look Under Biden?

Today, something special...an episode of The NPR Politics Podcast we think you might appreciate. Our colleagues take a look at Joe Biden's approach to climate and health policy.

How Will Climate And Health Policy Look Under Biden?

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