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A wind turbine is seen near Pinnacle Wind Farm in Keyser, West Virginia. This onetime coal town is emblematic of a nation-wide attempt to shift to renewable energy. Haiyun Jiang/NPR hide caption

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Haiyun Jiang/NPR

Wind Power Is Taking Over A West Virginia Coal Town. Will The Residents Embrace It?

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The International Space Station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour during a fly around of the orbiting lab on Nov. 8, 2021. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The International Space Station retires soon. NASA won't run its future replacement.

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The sun emits a mid-level solar flare releasing a burst of solar material. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Despite being addictive and deadly, menthol cigarettes were long advertised as a healthy alternative to "regular" cigarettes — and heavily advertised to Black folks in cities. Jackie Lay/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Lay/NPR

In this April 30, 2021, file image taken by the Mars Perseverance rover and made available by NASA, the Mars Ingenuity helicopter, right, flies over the surface of the planet. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

This illustration provided by the European Southern Observatory this month depicts the record-breaking quasar J059-4351, the bright core of a distant galaxy that is powered by a supermassive black hole. M. Kornmesser/AP hide caption

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M. Kornmesser/AP

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Feb. 15, 2024. The rocket is carrying Intuitive Machines' lunar lander on its way to the moon, with a planned Feb. 22 touchdown. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP
Julius Csotonyi

One woolly mammoth's journey at the end of the Ice Age

Lately, paleoecologist Audrey Rowe has been a bit preoccupied with a girl named Elma. That's because Elma is ... a woolly mammoth. And 14,000 years ago, when Elma was alive, her habitat in interior Alaska was rapidly changing. The Ice Age was coming to a close and human hunters were starting early settlements. Which leads to an intriguing question: Who, or what, killed her? In the search for answers, Audrey traces Elma's life and journey through — get this — a single tusk. Today, she shares her insights on what the mammoth extinction from thousands of years ago can teach us about megafauna extinctions today with guest host Nate Rott.

One woolly mammoth's journey at the end of the Ice Age

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Wind turbines are visible from the highway in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The state and the country are betting big on offshore wind power as a means to combat climate change. Rachel Wisniewski/For the Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Rachel Wisniewski/For the Washington Post/Getty Images

A Second Wind For Wind Power?

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This tuna, chickpea and parmesan salad bowl packs a protein punch, which is crucial for building muscle strength. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Millions of women are 'under-muscled.' These foods help build strength

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Jason Edwards/Getty Images

Access to the abortion drug mifepristone could soon be limited by the Supreme Court for the whole country. Here, a nurse practitioner works at an Illinois clinic that offers telehealth abortion. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Abortion pills that patients got via telehealth and the mail are safe, study finds

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In January, a man living on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula died of Alaskapox. Pictured is Bear Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park on Sept. 1, 2015, in Seward, Alaska. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Tai chi has many health benefits. It improves flexibility, reduces stress and can help lower blood pressure. Ruth Jenkinson/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Ruth Jenkinson/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

Tai chi reduces blood pressure better than aerobic exercise, study finds

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Both President Biden and former President Donald Trump have made public gaffes on the campaign trail. Experts say such slips, on their own, are not cause for concern. Morry Gash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Morry Gash/Pool/Getty Images

Recent gaffes by Biden and Trump may be signs of normal aging — or may be nothing

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Chris Dollar steers his boat on the Ware River in Gloucester, Virginia in September. A charter fishing captain and conservation advocate, Dollar said he sees fewer fish in the bay and its tributaries than he used to. Schools of menhaden that used to be "the size of a football field" have shrunk to "maybe a tennis court," he said. Katherine Hafner/WHRO News hide caption

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Katherine Hafner/WHRO News

A small fish is at the center of a big fight in the Chesapeake Bay

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A stunned iguana lies on the sidewalk after having fallen from a tree on Jan. 6, 2010, in Surfside, Fla. Very cold temperatures can stun the invasive reptiles into a state called brumation. But the iguanas won't necessarily die. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Manny and Cayenne wrestle and kiss. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

Manny loves Cayenne. Plus, 5 facts about queer animals for Valentine's Day

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Ninety-seven percent of migratory fish species are facing extinction. Whale sharks, the world's largest living fish, are among the endangered. Ullstein Bild/Ullstein Bild hide caption

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Ullstein Bild/Ullstein Bild