World News and International Headlines NPR world news, international art and culture, world business and financial markets, world economy, and global trends in health, science and technology. Subscribe to the World Story of the Day podcast and RSS feed.

NPRWorld

Many Stories, One World

President Biden meets with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on the sidelines of the G-7 summit. A White House official said Biden did a lot of "diplomatic speed-dating" with world leaders. Official Photo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Official Photo/Getty Images

In this photo released by the Yunnan Forest Fire Brigade, a migrating herd of elephants graze near Shuanghe Township, Jinning District of Kunming city in southwestern China's Yunnan Province, on June 4. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Pilgrims walk around the Kaaba at the Grand Mosque in the Muslim holy city of Mecca on July 31, 2020. Saudi Arabia says this year's hajj pilgrimage will be limited to no more than 60,000 people, all of them from within the kingdom. Ministry of Media/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ministry of Media/AP

A March 21 attack by the Assad regime forces and Iran-backed terrorist groups targeted a hospital in Aleppo, killing six civilians and injuring 15. Above: A view of the damaged site. Kasim Rammah/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kasim Rammah/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

How many oceans are there? It's National Geographic official now: There are five. Alexander Gerst/ESA via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Gerst/ESA via Getty Images

Coming Soon To An Atlas Near You: A Fifth Ocean

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005668441/1005670695" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. and Chinese flags before the opening session of 2019 trade negotiations between U.S. and Chinese trade representatives in Beijing. China just passed a sweeping law designed to counter sanctions the U.S. and the European Union have imposed on Chinese officials and major Chinese companies. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Schiefelbein/AP

China's New Anti-Foreign Sanctions Law Sends A Chill Through The Business Community

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005467033/1005670719" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sign is displayed outside a McDonald's restaurant in Des Moines, Iowa. The company said customers' personal data in South Korea and Taiwan was accessed in a data breach. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Neibergall/AP

President Biden and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson speak during a bilateral meeting ahead of the G-7 summit on Thursday in Carbis Bay, England. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

A sculpture created out of electronic waste in the likeness of Mount Rushmore and the G-7 leaders sits on a hill in Cornwall, England, near where the leaders of the world's wealthiest nations will meet. Jon Super/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Super/AP

2 Artists Want G-7 Leaders To End E-Waste. So They Sculpted Them Out Of Trash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005263805/1005263808" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Uyghurs living in Turkey protested China in March for the country's human rights abuses in its western Xinjiang province. A new Amnesty International report substantiates these abuses, calling them "crimes against humanity." Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Emrah Gurel/AP

New Report Details Firsthand Accounts Of Torture From Uyghur Muslims In China

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005263835/1005263838" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Froggyland diorama shows a teacher trying to control a class in which students are hitting each other with rulers, arriving late to class and balancing pencils on their noses. Each diorama displays anthropomorphized frogs in human scenes of the early 20th century. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rob Schmitz/NPR

Welcome To Froggyland, The Croatian Taxidermy Museum That May Soon Come To The U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1000842832/1005263871" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden arrive Wednesday at Royal Air Force Mildenhall in England ahead of the G-7 summit. The president will try to reestablish U.S. global leadership and repair old friendships. Joe Giddens/Pool via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Giddens/Pool via AP

World Leaders Are Meeting To Tackle Climate Change And Pandemic Recovery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1004471127/1005419034" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A mini replica of the French-designed Statue of Liberty will reach the U.S. on July 1. Here, the statue awaits its move in Paris on Monday. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Francois Mori/AP

The government of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is in a standoff with social media companies over what content gets investigated or blocked online, and who gets to decide. Bikas Das/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bikas Das/AP

India And Tech Companies Clash Over Censorship, Privacy And 'Digital Colonialism'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1004387255/1004401365" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Signs on a screen are shown before an athletics test event for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games last month at the National Stadium in Tokyo. Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Japan Aims To Convince A Wary Public The Olympics Will Be Safe

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1005091291/1005114970" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">