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Abraar Karan spent time in rural India in 2008 while working for Unite for Sight, a nonprofit group that provides eye care. Above: He interviews a woman about the challenge of living from severe cataracts. Daniel Carvalho hide caption

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Daniel Carvalho

A doctor for imprisoned Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who is in the third week of a hunger strike, said on Saturday that his health is deteriorating rapidly and that the 44-year-old Kremlin critic could be on the verge of death. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Members of the royal family follow Prince Philip's coffin during the ceremonial procession during his funeral at Windsor Castle on Saturday in Windsor, England. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

People wait for their turn to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at a government hospital in Chennai, India, on Friday. Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images

What Can Wealthy Nations Do To Address Global Vaccine Inequity?

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India, Farming, and the Free Market

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Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov addresses the media Friday in Moscow. Lavrov announced that Russia will expel 10 U.S. diplomats. The move comes after the Biden administration ordered 10 Russian diplomats to leave the U.S. a day earlier. Yuri Kochetkov/Pool via AP hide caption

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Yuri Kochetkov/Pool via AP

Raúl Castro, first secretary of the Cuban Communist Party and the country's former president, clasps hands with Cuban President Miguel Mario Díaz-Canel Bermúdez during the closing session at the National Assembly of Popular Power in 2019 in Havana. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

In a letter to the White House, 24 senators said the U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba "has damaged America's reputation, fueled anti-Muslim bigotry, and weakened the United States' ability to counter terrorism and fight for human rights and the rule of law around the world." Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images

Senators Urge Biden To Shut Down Guantánamo, Calling It A 'Symbol Of Lawlessness'

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Pro-democracy activist Lee Cheuk-yan, center, arrives at a court in Hong Kong Friday. Seven of Hong Kong's leading pro-democracy advocates, including Lee, and pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai, were sentenced Friday for organizing a march during the 2019 anti-government protests. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

9 Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Activists Sentenced For 2019 Protests

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Najat Hamza had been living in the U.S. for almost two decades after fleeing Ethiopia's regional state of Oromia when she was young, she told StoryCorps in 2017. "My heart will always belong to Oromia," she said. Najat Hamza hide caption

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Najat Hamza

An Ethiopian American Refugee Longs For Her Homeland

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President Biden has sought to focus his administration's foreign policy on the challenges posed by China — a topic he is set to discuss with Japan's prime minister on Friday. Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images

U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, center, walks on the red carpet with Afghan officials as they review an honor guard at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, on March 21. President Biden said the U.S. will withdraw all remaining troops from the country by Sept. 11, ending the U.S. involvement in the America's longest-ever war. AP hide caption

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AP

A car parked in a Fresno Gurdwara, or Sikh temple, parking lot with a bumper sticker showing support for Indian farmers protesting new agricultural laws. Jonaki Mehta/NPR hide caption

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Jonaki Mehta/NPR

For Calif. Sikh Farmers, India Protests Cast 'Dark Cloud' Over Vaisakhi Festival

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President Biden walks through Arlington National Cemetery to honor fallen veterans of the Afghan conflict in Arlington, Va., on Wednesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

'I Wish There Was An Easy Ending:' Afghanistan's Murky Future After Longest U.S. War

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U.S. Marines conduct an operation to clear a village of Taliban fighters on July 5, 2009, in Mian Poshteh, Afghanistan. The U.S. and NATO forces plan to withdraw their remaining troops from Afghanistan by September. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga speaks to media in Tokyo this month. Suga will take part in a Friday summit meeting with President Biden, the first foreign leader to meet the president face to face. Eugene Hoshiko, Pool/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko, Pool/AP

China To Loom Large At Biden's Summit With Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga

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