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What will Donald Trump say at the Republican National Convention this week, after an attempt on his life? Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

What will Trump tell the RNC after an attempt on his life?

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Trump's pick for Vice President, U.S. Sen. J.D. Vance (R-OH) arrives on the first day of the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Andrew Harnik/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Getty Images

The political evolution of J.D. Vance

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A man wears a mask of Donald Trump in front of the Alto Lee Adams Sr. U.S. Courthouse in Florida on February 12. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

After the assassination attempt, Trump gets a string of wins

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Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump pumps his fist as he is rushed offstage during a rally on July 13, 2024 in Butler, Pennsylvania. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

A would-be assassin targets Trump. What it could mean for America.

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President Joe Biden holds a news conference at the NATO Summit on July 11, 2024 in Washington, DC. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Older voters have thoughts on whether Biden's up to the job

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Covenant Mom Melissa Alexander watches the Tennessee state legislature from the gallery. Kevin Wurm for NPR hide caption

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Heads of state pose for a group photo during the NATO 75th anniversary celebratory event at the Andrew Mellon Auditorium in Washington D.C. (July 9, 2024) Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Russia is Top of Mind at NATO summit

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom. This past week he signed a nearly $300 billion state budget in which $12 million was allocated for reparations legislation. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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California is trying to lead the way on reparations but not clear on the path to take

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Tennessee State Senator Richard Briggs speaks with a colleague. Kevin Wurm for NPR hide caption

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The US Supreme Court on July 1, 2024, in Washington, DC. DREW ANGERER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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DREW ANGERER/AFP via Getty Images

Supreme Court rules Trump is immune from prosecution for certain official acts

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U.S. President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden at a post-debate campaign rally on June 28, 2024 in Raleigh, North Carolina. Allison Joyce/Getty Images hide caption

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Biden tries to reassure voters after a shaky debate performance

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Participants hold signs during March for Our Lives 2022 on June 11, 2022 in Washington, DC. Paul Morigi/Getty Images for March For Our Lives hide caption

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Paul Morigi/Getty Images for March For Our Lives

Gun violence is getting worse. Can a shift in perspective be the solution?

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Lena Waithe on Wild Card Vivien Killilea/Getty hide caption

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Jackie Lay

Melissa Alexander and Mary Joyce speak to state representative John Gillespie at the Tennessee statehouse. Kevin Wurm for NPR hide caption

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Wimberly Muñoz, a Venezuelan migrant waited at the Chaparral pedestrian border in Tijuana, Mexico to cross into the US. She is traveling with her mother, Ana Muñoz, right, and son Matia Muñoz. Carlos A. Moreno/NPR hide caption

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Carlos A. Moreno/NPR

Biden's executive actions on immigration send mixed signals

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Kay Tobin/New York Public Library

Taylor Tomlinson on Wild Card Monica Schipper/Getty hide caption

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Monica Schipper/Getty

For many college-bound students, the federal financial aid process has been beset by problems. John Lamb/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamb/Getty Images

Issues with FAFSA could mean many students don't go to college in the fall

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Donald Trump and then Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence at the 2016 Republican National Convention. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Vice presidents can make or break a candidate. Here's how Trump is choosing

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Kevin Wurm for NPR