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Pastor Denell Howard leads a prayer Saturday at a vigil at Olivet Missionary Baptist Church in Indianapolis for the victims of the shooting Thursday at a FedEx facility. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Mourners have built a makeshift memorial for Daunte Wright on the streets of Brooklyn Center, Minn., the quiet inner-ring suburb where police shot and killed Wright on April 11. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

A Georgia Tech employee receives a Pfizer coronavirus vaccination on the campus April 8. For a number of Americans, getting their shots is as easy as showing up to their workplace as some companies and institutions provide on-site vaccinations to their employees. Danny Karnik/AP hide caption

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Danny Karnik/AP

For Some Americans, Getting A Vaccine Is As Easy As Showing Up To Work

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A woman views a collage of photos of Amarjeet Johal during a vigil at Monument Circle on Sunday in Indianapolis. Four of the people killed in the mass shooting were members of the Sikh community. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Young people today are getting ready to make the most of their youth by partying like these young women did back in the 1920s. Kirn Vintage Stock/Getty Images hide caption

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Kirn Vintage Stock/Getty Images

Tony Johnson is chair of the Chinook Indian Nation, a federally unrecognized tribe. He stands on a Willapa Bay, Wash., beach, where he got married and not far from where his ancestors lived. Eilis O'Neill/KUOW hide caption

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Eilis O'Neill/KUOW

Unrecognized Tribes Struggle Without Federal Aid During Pandemic

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Molly Garris, 94, moved in with one of her daughters during the pandemic. The move has meant she's able to enjoy a game of spades, one of her favorite pastimes, with her family, including her grandson-in-law, All Things Considered producer Jason Fuller. Carolyn Dixon hide caption

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Carolyn Dixon

For Seniors Looking To Stay Sharp In The Pandemic, Try A Game Of Spades

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A person holds up a portrait of George Floyd as people gather outside the Hennepin County Government Center on April 9 in Minneapolis Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Critics Say Chauvin Defense 'Weaponized' Stigma For Black Americans With Addiction

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Michael Carvajal, the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, speaking to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. via Getty Images

Jerry Falwell Jr., pictured at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, is the subject of a new lawsuit by Liberty University, his former employer. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Workers at Amazon's facility in Bessemer, Ala., held a historic vote on whether to form the company's first warehouse union. Bill Barrow/AP hide caption

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Bill Barrow/AP

What Amazon's Defeat Of Union Effort Means For The Future Of American Labor

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Pro-union Amazon warehouse worker Jennifer Bates vows at a rally in Birmingham to keep fighting to unionize the Amazon Bessemer warehouse. Stephan Bisaha for NPR hide caption

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Stephan Bisaha for NPR

Big Union Loss At Amazon Warehouse Casts Shadow Over Labor Movement

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Georgetown Law School professor Paul Butler testifies before a House Judiciary Committee hearing on policing practices and law enforcement accountability in June 2020. In an NPR interview, Butler says police in Brooklyn Center, Minn., didn't need to pursue Daunte Wright over an outstanding warrant. Mandel Ngan/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/Pool/Getty Images

Law Professor: Police Hold 'Extraordinary' Power Over Black People In Traffic Stops

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In a letter to the White House, 24 senators said the U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba "has damaged America's reputation, fueled anti-Muslim bigotry, and weakened the United States' ability to counter terrorism and fight for human rights and the rule of law around the world." Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images

Senators Urge Biden To Shut Down Guantánamo, Calling It A 'Symbol Of Lawlessness'

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Protesters gathered at a memorial a Louisville, Ky. park on March 13, 2021, the anniversary of Breonna Taylor's killing. Jonathan Mattingly, one of the officers involved in the fatal raid, is facing widespread criticism for planning to publish a book about it. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

Lab assistant Tammy Brown dons personal protective equipment in a lab at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. She works on preparing positive coronavirus tests for sequencing to discern variants rapidly spreading throughout the country. Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images

An NPR investigation into the SolarWinds attack reveals a hack unlike any other, launched by a sophisticated adversary intent on exploiting the soft underbelly of our digital lives. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

Najat Hamza had been living in the U.S. for almost two decades after fleeing Ethiopia's regional state of Oromia when she was young, she told StoryCorps in 2017. "My heart will always belong to Oromia," she said. Najat Hamza hide caption

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Najat Hamza

An Ethiopian American Refugee Longs For Her Homeland

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Ciera Amaro's art is one of the submissions to a project called Dispatches from Quarantine. Ciera Amaro via Alexandra Zapruder hide caption

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Ciera Amaro via Alexandra Zapruder

Dispatches From Quarantine: How Young People Are Documenting History

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Barbara Gaught stands outside the home she's now renting in Billings, Mont., with her 5-year-old son, Blazen, and their dog, Arie. Gaught and her family were evicted from the mobile home they had owned outright and lived in for 16 years because they fell behind on 'lot rent' for the little plot of land under the mobile home. Louise Johns for NPR hide caption

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Louise Johns for NPR

Losing It All: Mobile Home Owners Evicted Over Small Debts During Pandemic

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