Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

Following the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, the George Washington University law school received calls to drop Justice Clarence Thomas and cancel the seminar he taught. Erin Schaff, The New York Times /AP hide caption

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Erin Schaff, The New York Times /AP

The share of Americans who believe colleges and universities have a positive impact on the country has declined since 2020, according to recent survey. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Brandie Diamond describes herself as a "transgender truck driver/chef/Jill-of-all-trades." But her career in trucking began in the mid-1980s, and she hadn't come out as trans back then. Meg Vogel for NPR hide caption

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Meg Vogel for NPR

What women truckers can tell us about living and working alone

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LA Johnson/NPR

200k student borrowers are closer to getting their loans erased after judge's ruling

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From 2011, at an Occupy DC protest in Washington. A man holds a sign and a ball and chain, representing his college loan debt. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) Jacquelyn Martin/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Student Loans: The Fund-Eating Dragon

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Statue of Denmark Vesey at Hampton Park in Charleston, S.C. Formerly enslaved, Vesey bought his freedom with money he was allowed to earn and winnings from a lottery ticket, and he planned an insurrection to kill slaveholders and free Black people on July 14, 1822. Victoria Hansen/ SC Public Radio hide caption

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Victoria Hansen/ SC Public Radio

The future of abortion remains highly uncertain in Michigan. At the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, the student health center has been preparing for all possible scenarios, from a complete statewide ban on abortion to less extreme changes. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Colleges navigate confusing legal landscapes as new abortion laws take effect

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Yasmine Gateau for NPR

The U.S. student population is more diverse, but schools are still highly segregated

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Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at a news conference at Crooms Academy of Information Technology in Sanford to discuss Florida's civics education initiative of unbiased history teachings. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Florida Gov. DeSantis takes aim at what he sees as indoctrination in schools

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A teenage girl wearing a face mask, head scarf and long black robe listens to a math teacher at a tutoring center in Kabul. The center was established by a women's rights activist to circumvent a Taliban ban on girls attending secondary school. The activist said she has informal permission by Taliban authorities to run the center as long as teenage girls abide by a strict dress code. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

Secret schools enable Afghanistan's teen girls to skirt Taliban's education ban

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A24

School Colors Bonus: "Ms. Mitchell's Pandemic Diary" Cassandra Giraldo hide caption

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Cassandra Giraldo

A family walks towards Rochdale Village housing co-op and complex in Queens on April 28, 2022. (NPR/Cassandra Geraldo) Cassandra Giraldo /Cassandra Giraldo hide caption

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Cassandra Giraldo /Cassandra Giraldo

Uvalde School Police Chief Pete Arredondo (left) attends a news conference outside of the Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 26. Dario Lopez-Mills/AP hide caption

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Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

Arnulfo Reyes' sense of humor breaks through even in the darkest of times. /Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District hide caption

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/Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District

In Uvalde, he lost 11 students and was badly wounded. Now he looks for a path forward

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