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Rapid tests can help you figure out if you have been infected with the coronavirus. But how accurate are they? Scientists trying to find out whether they are less sensitive to omicron and why. JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

Rupali Limaye is a behavioral and social scientist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health hide caption

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Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

People receive boxes of KN95 face masks during a back to school event offering school supplies, COVID-19 vaccinations, face masks, and other resources for children and their families at the Weingart East Los Angeles YMCA in August. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

People attend the March for Life rally on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Friday. The march, in its 49th year, comes as a Supreme Court decision on abortion rights could unravel Roe v. Wade. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Demonstrators gathered in front of the U.S. Supreme Court as the justices heard arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health, a case about a Mississippi law that bans most abortions after 15 weeks, on December 01, 2021. Experts believe a ruling on this case could undermine or overturn Roe v. Wade. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), depicted above in yellow and surrounded by cellular debris, is a staph bacterium that resists treatment by many common antibiotics. The image is from a scanning electron micrograph. NIH/NAID/IMAGE.FR/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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NIH/NAID/IMAGE.FR/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

May Nast arrives for dinner at RiverWalk, an independent senior housing facility, in New York, April 1, 2021. COVID-19 infections are soaring again at U.S. nursing homes because of the omicron wave, and deaths are climbing too. That's leading to new restrictions on family visits and a renewed push to get more residents and staff members vaccinated and boosted. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Pro-life activists participate in the 48th annual March for Life outside the U.S. Supreme Court January 29, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Activists look ahead to what could be the 'last anniversary' for Roe

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People wait in line to test for COVID-19 on Wednesday, Jan. 12, 2022, in Long Beach, Calif. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

The Hodgepodge Of COVID Testing In The U.S.

The U.S. government has launched a website where people can request up to four free coronavirus tests per household--shipping is scheduled to begin in late January. They're responding to the fact that many Americans are really struggling to find tests as omicron surges across the country. (https://special.usps.com/testkits) Today on the show, our colleagues at Planet Money try to get tested — and they run into problems. From scammy testing sites to no tests at all, they explain what's behind the nation's COVID testing mess.

The Hodgepodge Of COVID Testing In The U.S.

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Staff members rehearse a victory ceremony at the Beijing Medals Plaza last week. The venue will host some medal ceremonies at the upcoming winter Olympics. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Starbucks is no longer requiring its U.S. workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19, reversing a policy it announced earlier this month, saying it was responding to last week's ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court. David Zalubowski/AP file photo hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP file photo

A resident receives a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a health center in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Jan. 13. This week, Indonesia started a program to give booster shots to the elderly and people at risk of severe disease. Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Booster longevity: Data reveals how long a third shot protects

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A person in recovery for drug addiction looks out from a substance abuse treatment center in Westborough, Mass. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Addiction Is Deadlier Than Ever. But New Research Shows Most Americans Can Heal

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