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A close-up of Mars taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. New research suggests that the red planet may be too small to have ever had large amounts of surface water. NASA/WireImage hide caption

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NASA/WireImage

Wilma Banks, who lives in the neighborhood of New Orleans East, sits on her bed next to her nebulizer and CPAP machine. In the aftermath of Hurricane Ida, when much of New Orleans was left without power, she wasn't able to power up the medical devices and had only her limited supply of inhalers to widen her airways. Kathleen Flynn for ProPublica hide caption

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Kathleen Flynn for ProPublica

The new Emancipation and Freedom Monument in Richmon, Va., features two 12-foot bronze statues of a man and woman holding an infant who have been newly freed from slavery. Virginia's Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Commission hide caption

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Virginia's Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Commission

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley speaks during a briefing with Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin in September at the Pentagon in Washington. The top U.S. military officer met with his Russian counterpart Wednesday Sept. 22, 2021 in Helsinki, Finland. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro pulls off his protective face mask to address the 76th Session of the U.N. General Assembly at United Nations headquarters in New York, Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021. Eduardo Munoz/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/AP

The pandemic appears to have peaked or be on the verge of peaking, with cases projected to slowly decline this fall and winter. As recently as Sept. 8, people were waiting at COVID-19 testing site in Kentucky, where over 4,000 new cases were confirmed that day. Jeffrey Dean/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeffrey Dean/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Is The Worst Over? Modelers Predict A Steady Decline In COVID Cases Through March

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In this undated photo provided by HBO, actor Willie Garson appears as Stanford Blatch in "And Just Like That." Garson, who played Stanford Blatch, on TV's "Sex and the City" and its movie sequels, has died, his son announced Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2021. He was 57. AP hide caption

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AP

Congress is in a familiar political standoff over spending and debt that could have serious economic consequences. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, seen in February, U.S. Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, has made the inclusion of Latinos in media a principal issue. A government report says the absence of Latinos in the media could impact how their fellow Americans view them. AP hide caption

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AP

China says it will stop financing new coal-fired power plants in other countries, but coal use is expected to keeping rising within its borders. GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images

A pamphlet from a Pride Month event at the Pentagon in 2015. Monday marked the 10th anniversary of the repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy in the U.S. military. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

LGBTQ Vets Discharged Under 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Have New Chance For Full Benefits

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Video game maker Activision Blizzard said Tuesday that it is complying with a recent Securities and Exchange Commission subpoena sent to current and former employees and executives and the company itself on "employment matters and related issues." Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

A community of young investors on TikTok, including @ceowatchlist, @quicktrades and @irisapp, are using House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's stock trading disclosures as inspiration for where to invest themselves. One user called Pelosi the market's "biggest whale," while another called her the "queen of investing." @ceowatchlist; @quicktrades; @irisapp/TikTok hide caption

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@ceowatchlist; @quicktrades; @irisapp/TikTok

TikTokers Are Trading Stocks By Copying What Members Of Congress Do

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