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People walk by the AMC 34th Street theater on March 5, 2021, in New York. AMC Theaters, the nation's largest movie theater chain, on Monday unveiled a new pricing scheme in which seat location determines how much your movie ticket costs. Seats in the middle will cost a dollar or two more, while seats in the front row will be slightly cheaper. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

A sign for the Food and Drug Administration is seen outside of the headquarters in White Oak, Md., on July 20, 2020. The FDA announced a recall of hundreds of ready-to-eat food products. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

World leaders recently announced a $20 billion climate deal to help get Indonesia off coal power. But there are doubts about the deal because — for one thing — the country is planning to build new coal plants, including here in Kalimantan. Adek Berry/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Adek Berry/AFP via Getty Images

Emma Alexander was recently laid off from Goldman Sachs, along with over 3,000 other employees. Although the layoffs were unusually large this year, they are an ever-lurking prospect for people who work in finance. Allison V. Smith hide caption

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Allison V. Smith

It's nothing personal: On Wall Street, layoffs are a way of life

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Kaitlyn Arland drives in her car in Junction City, Kan. Two years ago, when she tried to buy her first car, the dealership called her back and demanded she sign a new deal with a higher down payment after she had taken the car home. This tactic is often referred to as a yo-yo deal. Arin Yoon for NPR hide caption

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Arin Yoon for NPR

Even after you think you bought a car, dealerships can 'yo-yo' you and take it back

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Gas utilities and cooking stove manufacturers knew for decades that burners could be made that emit less pollution in homes, but they chose not to. That may may be about to change. Sean Gladwell/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gladwell/Getty Images

Gas stove makers have a pollution solution. They're just not using it

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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York City on Jan. 18, 2023. Stocks have rallied this year on hopes about the economy, but some fear that optimism is misplaced. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Elon Musk, center, leaves a federal courthouse in San Francisco on Feb. 3. A high-profile trial focused on a 2018 tweet about the financing for a Tesla buyout that never happened drew a surprise spectator for Friday's final arguments — Elon Musk, the billionaire who is being accused of misleading investors with his usage of the Twitter service he now owns. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Mike Kaeding, center, is the CEO of Norhart, a company that builds, manages and maintains apartment buildings. Courtesy of Norhart hide caption

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Courtesy of Norhart

Is it hot in here, or is it just the new jobs numbers?

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Julia Grugan, 20, a senior at Temple University recently made one of her first major investments: A 10 gram gold bar. Julia Grugan hide caption

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Julia Grugan

The new global gold rush

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Wesley Wade and his wife Giovonni couldn't find day care for their two kids, Helena and Ella. Wesley, a mental health counselor working on his PhD, ended up quitting his job to take care of the girls. All over the U.S. there is a shortage of child care. Wesley Wade hide caption

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Wesley Wade

Baby's first market failure

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A 'help wanted' sign is displayed in a window of a store in Manhattan, New York City, on Dec. 2, 2022. U.S. employers added an unexpectedly strong 517,000 jobs in January, showcasing the labor market is red-hot. The unemployment rate fell to its lowest level in more than half a century. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Tires of a truck are pictured at a gas station in Frankfurt, Germany, Jan. 27. A European ban on imports of diesel fuel and other products made from crude oil in Russian refineries takes effect Feb. 5. The goal is to stop feeding Russia's war chest, but fuel costs have already jumped since the war started and they could rise again. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

Europe bans Russian oil products, the latest strike on the Kremlin war chest

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This scanning electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows rod-shaped Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. U.S. health officials are advising people to stop using the over-the-counter eye drops, EzriCare Artificial Tears, that have been linked to an outbreak of drug-resistant infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Janice Haney Carr/AP hide caption

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Janice Haney Carr/AP

Presidential nominee Richard Nixon poses with a team of economic advisers in San Diego, CA, Aug. 14, 1968. From left to right; Dr. Pierre A. Rinfret; Dr. Milton Friedman; Nixon; Dr. Arthur Burns; Dr. Don Perlberg. AP hide caption

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AP

Arthur Burns: shorthand for Fed failure?

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Beyoncé performs at the Oscars in March 2022. Her "Renaissance" World Tour later this year will mark her first solo tour since 2016. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images