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James Brown and Don Cornelius take a break before an interview on Soul Train. Photo by Bruce W. Talamon © 2018 All Rights Reserved. /Bruce W. Talamon hide caption

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Photo by Bruce W. Talamon © 2018 All Rights Reserved. /Bruce W. Talamon

'Soul Train' and the business of Black joy

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European carriers are urging the European Union to alter so-called "use it or lose it" regulations forcing airlines to continue flying empty or near-empty flights. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Rob Kim/Getty Images

Indicators to watch in 2022

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A woman drinks an alcohol-free beer during the annual "Fete de la Musique" (music day), in the courtyard of the Elysee Palace in Paris in 2018. Christophe Petit Tesson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Petit Tesson/AFP via Getty Images

The TotalEnergies tower outside Paris on Sept.7, 2021. The French energy conglomerate has asked the American and French governments to support targeted sanctions against Myanmar's oil and gas funds, one of the military government's primary sources of funding. Rafael Yaghobzadeh/AP hide caption

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Rafael Yaghobzadeh/AP
Janice Chang for NPR

Student loan payments resume in May. Here are 7 ways to prepare

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Intel Corp. is planning to invest investment more than $20 billion in two computer chip plants in central Ohio to help address a global semiconductor shortage. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Joe Rogan, the comedian, TV commentator and podcaster, reacts during an Ultimate Fighting Championship event in May 2020. Douglas P. DeFelice/Getty Images hide caption

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What the Joe Rogan podcast controversy says about the online misinformation ecosystem

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Children draw on top of a canceled check prop during a rally in favor of the child tax credit in front of the U.S. Capitol on Dec. 13, 2021, in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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MAXIM ZMEYEV/AFP via Getty Images

How a bank messaging system could decimate Russia

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New homes under construction in Mebane, N.C., earlier this month. A historic shortage of homes for sale has been pushing prices sharply higher. So builders are trying to ramp up projects. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., told reporters she doesn't think new laws governing lawmakers' investments are needed, but if members want one she would go along with it. Eric Lee/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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A pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Now, a nonprofit group said it has raised around $900,000 for the alleged rioters, but some of their families are raising questions about how the money is being spent. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Experts see 'red flags' at nonprofit raising big money for Capitol riot defendants

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Staff members rehearse a victory ceremony at the Beijing Medals Plaza last week. The venue will host some medal ceremonies at the upcoming winter Olympics. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Starbucks is no longer requiring its U.S. workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19, reversing a policy it announced earlier this month, saying it was responding to last week's ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court. David Zalubowski/AP file photo hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP file photo
Lynsey Weatherspoon/Lynsey Weatherspoon/NPR

Even you can buy a house with cash

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The newest Girl Scout cookie, Adventurefuls, has fallen victim to supply chain and labor disruptions. The brownie-inspired treat features a caramel-flavored creme and a dash of sea salt. Bill Chappell/NPR hide caption

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In the lab with George Washington Carver, a prominent soil scientist and inventor of the early 20th Century. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Patent racism (classic)

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