Business and Financial News Find the latest business news with reports on Wall Street, interest rates, banking, companies, and U.S. and world financial markets. Subscribe to the Business Story of the Day podcast.

Business

Then presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks at a "Build Back Better" Clean Energy event on July 14, 2020. On Thursday, Biden unveiled an ambitious economic plan just days before he's set to be inaugurated as president. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

$1,400 Checks And Help For The Jobless: What's In Biden's Plan To Rescue The Economy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956940196/957141195" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

Making Sense Of Pandemic Stats

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956471751/956836360" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A plant in Waterloo, Iowa, is one of several Tyson Foods facilities that experienced severe outbreaks of the coronavirus among workers last year. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Neibergall/AP

U.S. Still Lags In COVID-19 Workplace Safety, Former OSHA Official Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956448224/956705129" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

'Artists, Weirdos, Hellriders And Homies:' Thrasher Magazine Turns 40

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956464916/956705123" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said on Wednesday that he believes tech companies that banned President Trump from various social media platforms was a move that sets a dangerous precedent for a free Internet. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

Nervous TikTok

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956558906/956643310" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

FAA administrator Stephen Dickson, seen testifying before a Senate committee last year, has ordered "zero tolerance" of passengers who disrupt airline flights. Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images
Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Companies Get Political

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956553990/956563805" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Airbnb said it is canceling reservations — and blocking new ones — in the D.C. area during the week that President-elect Joe Biden will be inaugurated. Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images

The contract for Wollman Ice Rink in New York City's Central Park is operated by the Trump Organization and among those that will be terminated by the city. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Lennihan/AP

New York City Cancels Contracts With Trump Organization

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956153682/956705117" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Skepticism about COVID-19 vaccinations has prompted suggestions that the government should pay people to get the shots. (AP Photo/LM Otero) LM Otero/AP hide caption

toggle caption
LM Otero/AP

Should The Government Pay People To Get Vaccinated? Some Economists Think So

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/955594105/956405679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Fox Business host Lou Dobbs suggested Republicans who voted to certify President-elect Joe Biden's win were "criminal." John Lamparski/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Lamparski/Getty Images

After Deadly Capitol Riot, Fox News Stays Silent On Stars' Incendiary Rhetoric

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/955694096/956506285" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

YouTube is the latest social media company to shut down President Trump's account following the riots at the U.S. Capitol. Martin Bureau /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Bureau /AFP via Getty Images

A worker is seen inside the production chain at Renesas Electronics, a semiconductor manufacturer, in Beijing on May 14, 2020. A global computer chip shortage is affecting automakers. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images

Auto Production Disrupted By Chip Shortages: A Dream Car May Be Hard To Find

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956097426/956145789" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

The SPAC Is Back!

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956169423/956181567" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

During Mike Pompeo's visit to VOA, journalist Patsy Widakuswara tried to ask him whether he regretted saying there would be a second Trump administration after Joe Biden's victory in November. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP