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A man works on the evening broadcast from TOLOnews, Afghanistan's first 24/7 new channel. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Inside a TV news station determined to report facts in the Taliban's Afghanistan

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The Penguin logo is visible on the spine of a book. The U.S. Department of Justice is suing Penguin Random House and Simon & Schuster to block the companies from completing a merger valued at $2.175 billion. Tim Ireland/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Ireland/PA Images via Getty Images

Authors and bookstore owners worry a big publishing merger will affect diversity

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Ron DeSantis, seen speaking to reporters from Fox News in 2018 when he was running for governor of Florida, has been prominent in a recent trend of Republicans ignoring or actively avoiding mainstream press, particularly national outlets. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Republicans have long feuded with the mainstream media. Now many are shutting them out

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Andrew Hancock/Andrew Hancock/Purdue University

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán told the crowd at the CPAC conference in Dallas on Thursday that they were fighting a "culture war." Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Hungary's autocratic leader tells U.S. conservatives to join his culture war

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James Yang/James Yang

Summer School 4: Inflation & Drinking Buddies

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James Yang/James Yang

Planet Money Summer School 4: Inflation & Drinking Buddies

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Pavel Kuljuk's cat, Dora, sits in a window in eastern Ukraine. Pavel Kuljuk hide caption

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Pavel Kuljuk

Listen.

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Wikipedia has locked its page for "recession," setting restrictions on who can edit the entry until next week. The freeze was set after editors made a series of revisions to the definition of "recession." Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

What is a recession? Wikipedia can't decide

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Streaming service Hulu is now allowing political ad buyers to address issues like abortion rights and gun control. Budrul Chukrut/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Budrul Chukrut/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Hulu will take political ads on contentious issues after a social media outcry

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James Yang/James Yang

Summer School 3: Booms, Busts & Us

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James Yang/James Yang

Planet Money Summer School 3: Booms, Busts & Us

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Amanda Aronczyk/NPR

Late on the afternoon of Jan. 6, 2021, then-President Donald Trump affectionately addressed insurrectionists at the U.S. Capitol from the White House. The House select committee investigating the siege says the then president failed to act for hours — instead "gleefully" watching TV. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images
James Yang/James Yang

Illustration by James Yang James Yang for NPR hide caption

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James Yang for NPR

A student discovers macroeconomics in the darkness of the Great Depression. James Yang for NPR hide caption

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James Yang for NPR

SUMMER SCHOOL 1: Recessions & Rap Battles

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