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U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's fugitive operations team makes an arrest at a home in Paramount, Calif., on March 1, 2020. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

Biden's limits on ICE offered hope. But immigrant advocates say he's broken promises

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Children draw on top of a canceled check prop during a rally in favor of the child tax credit in front of the U.S. Capitol on Dec. 13, 2021, in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

In Georgia, Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis is weighing whether Donald Trump and others committed crimes by trying to pressure Georgia officials to overturn Joe Biden's presidential election victory. Ben Gray/AP hide caption

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Ben Gray/AP

District attorney in Georgia asks for a special grand jury for Trump election probe

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a news conference Tuesday on Capitol Hill following a Senate Democratic Caucus meeting on voting rights and the filibuster. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Schumer insists failed votes on voting rights and filibuster were right thing to do

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., told reporters she doesn't think new laws governing lawmakers' investments are needed, but if members want one she would go along with it. Eric Lee/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Lee/Pool/Getty Images

President Biden planned to talk about infrastructure on the anniversary of his inauguration. But first, he had to clean up some comments he had made about Russia and Ukraine. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A poll worker in Austin, Texas, stamps a voter's 2020 ballot before dropping it into a secure box. Ahead of the state's March primary, local election officials in Texas are starting to deal with the effects of the new GOP-backed voting law. Sergio Flores/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Why Texas election officials are rejecting hundreds of vote-by-mail applications

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U.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the end of the war in Afghanistan in the State Dining Room at the White House on August 31, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Pro-life activists participate in the 48th annual March for Life outside the U.S. Supreme Court January 29, 2021 in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Activists look ahead to what could be the 'last anniversary' for Roe

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A pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Now, a nonprofit group said it has raised around $900,000 for the alleged rioters, but some of their families are raising questions about how the money is being spent. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Experts see 'red flags' at nonprofit raising big money for Capitol riot defendants

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Supreme Court hears arguments on campaign finance law, issues statement on NPR report

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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Lawmakers from both parties are stepping up calls to ban members of Congress from trading individual stocks. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A push to ban members of Congress from trading individual stocks gains momentum

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Immigration activists rally near the White House on Oct. 7, 2021. The group demonstrated for immigration reform and urged President Biden to authorize a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

A year after mobilizing for Biden, young supporters feel let down on immigration

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