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President Biden speaks about the pandemic and the country's vaccination campaign on Thursday at the White House. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Hopes To Boost COVID Vaccination Rates By Focusing On Federal Workers

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First lady Jill Biden arrives in Savannah, Ga., on July 8. She was injured last weekend while reportedly stepping on an object on a beach in Hawaii. Jim Watson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Statuary Hall is seen in 2015. A group of senators is introducing a new effort to increase the number of statues of women in the halls of the U.S. Capitol. VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

All But 5% Of U.S. Capitol Sculptures Are Of Men. Some Senators Want To Change That

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The lead GOP negotiators on the bipartisan infrastructure legislation — Sens. Lisa Murkowski (from left), Bill Cassidy, Rob Portman, Susan Collins and Mitt Romney — speak to reporters Wednesday at the U.S. Capitol. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Capitol Police Pfc. Harry Dunn wipes his eye as he testifies during Tuesday's House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack. During his testimony, Dunn said rioters hurled racial epithets at him and other Black officers. Oliver Contreras/AP hide caption

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Oliver Contreras/AP

The moves by the Justice Department are part of the Biden administration's push to demonstrate it is on guard amid new voting restrictions that Republican-led states have proposed and enacted. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

President Biden speaks Wednesday at a Mack Trucks facility in Macungie, Pa., about the importance of U.S. manufacturing and buying products made in America. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Fuel holding tanks are pictured at Colonial Pipeline's Dorsey Junction Station in Woodbine, Maryland in May 2021, the month that a cyberattack disrupted gas supply to the eastern U.S. for several days. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Biden delivers remarks Tuesday while visiting the Office of the Director Of National Intelligence in McLean, Va. Alex Edelman/CNP/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/CNP/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A White House Plan Aims To Speed Up Consideration Of Many Asylum Claims

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U.S. Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino Gonell wipes tears while testifying Tuesday during the opening hearing of the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Jim Bourg/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Bourg/Pool/Getty Images

U.S. Capitol Police Pfc. Harry Dunn testifies Tuesday during a House select committee hearing about the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Oliver Contreras/The New York Times via AP hide caption

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Oliver Contreras/The New York Times via AP

U.S. Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino Gonell (from left), officers Michael Fanone and Daniel Hodges of the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police Department, and Capitol Police Pfc. Harry Dunn are sworn in Tuesday before testifying before the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack. Oliver Contreras/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Oliver Contreras/Pool/Getty Images

A new spending deal includes $300 million to upgrade windows and doors at the U.S. Capitol, and to install new cameras. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images