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Yu Darvish #11 of the San Diego Padres throws a pitch during the third inning against the St. Louis Cardinals at Petco Park on April 2, 2024 in San Diego, California. Brandon Sloter/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Sloter/Getty Images

How climate change and physics affect baseball, America's favorite pastime

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A mother humpback whale and calf are seen on the coast of Vitoria, Espirito Santo state, Brazil on August 22, 2023. Carl de Souza/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Carl de Souza/AFP via Getty Images

Indigenous leaders want to protect whales by granting them legal personhood

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A woman and her child stand in front of a landscape denuded by gold mining in the southern Peruvian jungle in the Madre de Dios region. This picture is from 2015. Today, there's an effort to plant saplings to revive the forest. Ernesto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images

During spawning corals release their eggs and sperm, filling the water like confetti, which combine to create the next generation of reef builders. Marie Roman/AIMS hide caption

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Marie Roman/AIMS

Scientists are breeding 'super corals.' Can they withstand climate change?

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Science writer David Baron witnesses his first total solar eclipse in Aruba, 1998. He says seeing one is "like you've left the solar system and are looking back from some other world." Paul Myers hide caption

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Paul Myers

The physical sensations of watching a total solar eclipse

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Sea levels in Guyana are rising several times faster than the global average. High tides sometimes spill over the seawall that is meant to protect the coastline. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

The two sides of Guyana: a green champion and an oil producer

For Guyana the potential wealth from oil development was irresistible — even as the country faces rising seas. Today on the show, host Emily Kwong talks to reporter Camila Domonoske about her 2021 trip to Guyana and how the country is grappling with its role as a victim of climate change while it moves forward with drilling more oil. (encore)

The two sides of Guyana: a green champion and an oil producer

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Chevron operates a major refinery in Richmond, Calif., a community with high childhood asthma rates. It also owns the city's dominant news site, putting its own spin on events, and runs similar websites in Texas and Ecuador. Tracy J. Lee for NPR hide caption

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Tracy J. Lee for NPR

Chevron owns this city's news site. Many stories aren't told

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The coal power plant in Kemmerer, Wyoming, owned by Rocky Mountain Power, is scheduled to be decommissioned next year. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Why a town on the front line of America's energy transition isn't letting go of coal

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Warehouse workers often labor in extremely hot conditions in California, as do many others who work indoors. The state has been considering new rules to protect them when temperatures soar to dangerous levels, but political headwinds have left the rules in limbo. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Morning traffic fills the SR2 freeway in Los Angeles, California. The EPA released new rules for vehicle emissions that are expected to cut tailpipe pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, which are fueling climate change. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

In a boost for EVs, EPA finalizes strict new limits on tailpipe emissions

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Shell's petrochemical complex along the Ohio River in Beaver County, Pa., June 2022. Reid R. Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid R. Frazier/The Allegheny Front

Taxpayer-funded petrochemical plants are polluting communities, report finds

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The scraggly cherry blossom tree known as Stumpy on March 15 in Washington, D.C. At high tide, the base of the tree's trunk is inundated with several inches of water. Jacob Fenston hide caption

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Jacob Fenston

So long, Stumpy. More than 150 of D.C.'s cherry trees have to go as water rises

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The first operating South Fork Wind farm turbine stands east of Montauk Point, N.Y., on Dec. 7, 2023. South Fork Wind, America's first commercial-scale offshore wind farm, is officially open. Julia Nikhinson/AP hide caption

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Julia Nikhinson/AP

West Maui is a center of the tourism industry, raising concerns in the community that developers will buy properties destroyed in the fire as they come up for sale. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

After the fires, a Maui community tries a novel approach to keep homes in local hands

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Flares burn off methane and other hydrocarbons at an oil and gas facility in Lenorah, Texas in 2021. New research shows drillers emit about three times as much climate-warming methane as official estimates. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Oil and gas companies emit more climate-warming methane than EPA reports

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This type of staghorn coral (Acropora pulchra) appeared to benefit from the presence of sea cucumbers (Holothuria atra), a new study finds. Terry Moore/Stocktrek Images / Science Source hide caption

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Terry Moore/Stocktrek Images / Science Source

This often-overlooked sea creature may be quietly protecting the planet's coral reefs

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