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Edmund Garcia, an Iraq War veteran, stands outside his home in Rosharon, Texas. Like many vets, he was told if he took a mortgage forbearance, his monthly payments wouldn't go up afterward. Joseph Bui for NPR hide caption

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Joseph Bui for NPR

EU Commission Margrethe Vestager speaking to the media in Brussels in March 2024. On Tuesday April 9th she announced an investigation into Chinese wind turbine subsidies. Thierry Monasse/Getty Images Europe hide caption

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A drone show in advance of General Electric splitting into three companies: GE Aerospace, GE Vernova, and GE Healthcare Gary Hershorn/Corbis News/Getty Images hide caption

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Japan had a vibrant economy. Then it fell into a slump for 30 years.

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Hiring accelerated in the U.S. in March, adding 303,000 jobs, according to a report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate dipped to 3.8%, staying under 4% for more than two full years. People walk past a Home Depot in San Rafael, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Construction boom helps fuel job gains in March

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A sold sign stands outside a home in Wyndmoor, Pa., on June 22, 2022. Two recent studies suggest that prospective homeowners will have to earn more than $100,000 annually to afford a typical home in much of the U.S. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Israeli soldiers are seen near the Gaza Strip border in southern Israel, Monday, March 4, 2024. Ohad Zwigenberg/AP hide caption

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Ohad Zwigenberg/AP

How much of your tax dollars are going to Israel and Ukraine

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Shoppers walk past a delivery truck outside a Family Dollar in Hyattsville, Maryland. Family Dollar has announced it's closing 600 stores this year. Bloomberg / Contributor hide caption

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Bloomberg / Contributor

Francis Scott Key Bridge collapsed after being hit by the Dali container vessel, as seen from Riviera Beach, Md., on Tuesday. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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For Baltimore-area residents, bridge collapse means longer commutes, uncertain prospects

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