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National Security

The cargo ship Razoni crosses the Bosporus Strait in Istanbul, Turkey, on Aug. 3. The first cargo ship to leave Ukraine since the Russian invasion was anchored at an inspection area in the Black Sea off the coast of Istanbul Wednesday morning before moving on to Lebanon. Khalil Hamra/AP hide caption

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Khalil Hamra/AP

This handout image shows a Marine passing out water to evacuees during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 22. U.S. Central Command Public Affairs hide caption

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U.S. Central Command Public Affairs

A former Marine details the chaotic exit from Afghanistan — and how we should mark it

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The seashore on southwest Japan's Yonaguni island. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

On Japan's Yonaguni island, fears of being on the front line of a Taiwan conflict

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President Barack Obama delivers a televised statement that Osama bin Laden was killed in 2011. President Donald Trump makes a statement announcing the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in 2019. President Biden announces on Monday that a U.S. drone strike in Afghanistan killed al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri. Brendan Smialowski/Pool; Alex Wong; Jim Watson/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Pool; Alex Wong; Jim Watson/Pool/Getty Images

An April 2018 photo provided by the Chinese government shows the country's first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning (front), steaming with other ships during a drill at sea. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

The National Security Advisor's Very Busy Week

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., right, welcomes Paivi Nevala, minister counselor of the Finnish Embassy, left, and Karin Olofsdotter, Sweden's ambassador to the U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

White House National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Biden's national security adviser doubles down on Taiwan policy after Pelosi visit

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President Bill Clinton holds up his hands indicating no more questions as he and Chinese President Jiang Zemin hold a joint press conference in 1997 in Washington, D.C. Clinton confirmed that he agreed to lift a ban on the export of nuclear power technology to China. Joyce Naltchayan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joyce Naltchayan/AFP via Getty Images

What 3 past Taiwan Strait crises can teach us about U.S.-China tensions today

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Osama bin Laden (left) sits with his No. 2, Ayman al-Zawahiri, for an interview that was published in November 2001, shortly after the 9/11 attacks. The U.S. says it killed al-Zawahiri in a drone strike in Kabul on Sunday. (Photo by Visual News/Getty Images) Visual News/Getty Images hide caption

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Visual News/Getty Images

Al Qaeda Leader Killed In U.S. Drone Strike In Afghanistan

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In this 1998 file photo, Ayman al-Zawahiri (left) holds a press conference with Osama bin Laden in Khost, Afghanistan. Zawahiri succeeded bin Laden as al-Qaida's leader following the 2011 U.S. raid that killed bin Laden in Pakistan. Mazhar Ali Khan/Associated Press hide caption

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Mazhar Ali Khan/Associated Press

U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres says we are facing "a time of nuclear danger not seen since the height of the Cold War." His remarks came at the 2022 Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons at the United Nations in New York City. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

Osama bin Laden (left) sits with his No. 2, Ayman al-Zawahiri, for an interview that was published in November 2001, shortly after the 9/11 attacks. The U.S. says it killed al-Zawahiri in a drone strike in Kabul on Sunday. Visual News/Getty Images hide caption

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Visual News/Getty Images

In this photo released by the Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs, U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi walks with Taiwan's Foreign Minister Joseph Wu as she arrives in Taipei, Taiwan, on Tuesday, despite threats from Beijing of serious consequences, becoming the highest-ranking American official to visit the self-ruled island claimed by China in 25 years. Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs via AP hide caption

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Taiwan Ministry of Foreign Affairs via AP

Pelosi has landed in Taiwan. Here's why that's a big deal

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and others attend a news conference on Capitol Hill on Thursday, the day after Senate Republicans blocked a procedural vote to advance PACT Act. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Senate passed a bill to help sick veterans. Then 25 Republicans reversed course

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