Asia Asia

Asia

Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

A Royal New Zealand Air Force Hercules C-130 takes off from Whenuapai air base near Auckland, New Zealand, bound for Noumea, New Caledonia, on a mercy mission to rescue stranded New Zealand tourists on Tuesday, May 21, 2024. Michael Craig/NZ Herald via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Craig/NZ Herald via AP

Tin Serioso, 27, with her 1-year-old daughter Cat and 6-year-old Jay, inside their home in Novaliches, Quezon City in the Philippines on April 4, 2024. Her husband Chrismel Serioso was killed by police on October 3, 2023. Kimberly dela Cruz for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kimberly dela Cruz for NPR

The Sunday Story: Life in the Shadow of the Philippines' Drug War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198912731/1252218534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands during a bilateral meeting on Thursday in Beijing, China. Contributor/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Contributor/Getty Images

Putin and Xi further their embrace to defy U.S.-led pressure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1252069230/1252223499" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Thai activists hold a portrait of Netiporn Sanesangkhom, a member of the activist group Thaluwang outside of Criminal court in Bangkok, Thailand, on Tuesday. Sakchai Lalit/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sakchai Lalit/AP

Flanked by union members, President Biden signs orders that increase tariffs on imports of electric vehicles and other strategic goods from China. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Demonstrators hold up lights from their phones during a rally organized by Hong Kong mothers in support of extradition law protesters, in Hong Kong on July 5, 2019. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

Opinion: 'Glory be to thee, Hong Kong!'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1250616386/1250756771" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Biden makes his way to Air Force One after posing with highway patrol troopers in Mountain View, Calif., on May 10. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Indonesia's President-elect Prabowo Subianto (left) speaks to reporters with Vice President-elect Gibran Rakabuming Raka (second left) as they arrive at the plenary session of the General Elections Commission after his main rivals' challenges to his election victory were rejected in Jakarta, April 24. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images

A vendor holds a portrait of Indonesian President-elect Prabowo Subianto at a market in Jakarta, Indonesia, April 24. Achmad Ibrahim/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Achmad Ibrahim/AP

Indonesia's next president has a complicated history with the U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1248663743/1250052876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Taliban has a history of supporting the use of stoning as a punishment for "moral crimes" — reiterated in a statement this year by their supreme leader. Above: In 2015, Afghan Solidarity members gather in Kabul to protest Taliban militants who stoned an Afghan woman to death in the Taliban-controlled area outside Firozkoh, the capital of central Ghor province. She was accused of adultery. Wakil Kohsar /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Wakil Kohsar /AFP via Getty Images

Taliban affirms that stoning will be punishment for adulterers — especially women

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1242306960/1249655718" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Worshippers and tourists sit on boats facing the bank of the Ganges River in the holy Hindu city of Varanasi to watch the Ganga Aarti, a ritual of devotion to the venerated river. Hindu priests wave fire as the sun sets, ring bells and tap on drums. Thousands watch, clap and chant along from boats crammed in the water. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Diaa Hadid/NPR

Up and down the Ganges, India's Modi enjoys support after 10 years of rule

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1248045428/1252397434" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A banner that shows the late Sikh separatist leader Hardeep Singh Nijjar is displayed outside the Guru Nanak Sikh Gurdwara Sahib in Surrey, British Columbia, on Sept. 18, 2023. Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press via AP

Researchers in a rainforest in Indonesia spotted an injury on the face of a male orangutan they named Rakus. They were stunned to watch him treat his wound with a medicinal plant. Armas/Suaq Project hide caption

toggle caption
Armas/Suaq Project