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Steph Simon (pictured) and fellow rapper Dialtone were among the first artists contacted by Fire In Little Africa executive producer Stevie Johnson when he arrived in Tulsa in 2019. Ryan Cash/Fivvish/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ryan Cash/Fivvish/Courtesy of the artist

Kraftwerk, photographed in 1977. From left: Florian Schneider, Karl Bartos, Ralf Hütter and Wolfgang Flür. Gilbert Uzan/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images hide caption

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Gilbert Uzan/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Kraftwerk And Our Computer World

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They sought talent that fit the mindset of Black Wall Street — musicians who could set aside ego to commemorate their ancestors. Ryan Cash/Fivvish/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ryan Cash/Fivvish/Courtesy of the artist

Matt Allen, who records under the name Nur-D. Marrie Weigel /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Marrie Weigel /Courtesy of the artist

For Twin Cities Rapper Nur-D, Another Step Forward

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Digital Underground, led by Shock G, shown here in 1990, was one of the early rap groups to follow the example — in sound and energy — set by George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic. Raymond Boyd/Getty Images hide caption

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Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Arthur and Abrams have collaborated on similar projects in the past, including a rap opera about Muhammad Ali in 2017. O'Neil Arnold/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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O'Neil Arnold/Courtesy of the artist

'Music Is Music': A Rapper And A Conductor Cross Centuries In Louisville

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Across Haram, an Islamic term meaning "forbidden," the rappers billy woods and ELUCID dissect all things taboo, and how, ultimately, those commodities are still ubiquitous across cultures. Alexander Richter/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alexander Richter/Courtesy of the artist

Genesis Owusu Bailey Howard/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Bailey Howard/Courtesy of the artist

Genesis Owusu On World Cafe

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